Cross-Cultural Differences in Perspectives on the Self

Cross-Cultural Differences in Perspectives on the Self

Cross-Cultural Differences in Perspectives on the Self

Cross-Cultural Differences in Perspectives on the Self

Synopsis

Cross-Cultural Difference in Perspectives on the Self features the latest research in a dynamic area of inquiry and practice. Considered in these pages are cross-cultural differences in the idea of the person and in models of balancing obligations to the self, family, and community. Revisiting and questioning the concepts of self and self-worth, the authors investigate the extent to which factors traditionally associated with psychological effectiveness (intrinsic motivation; assuming personal responsibility for one's actions; and feeling in control, unique, hopeful, and optimistic) are culturally bound. Hazel Markus and Shinobu Kitayama consider cultural differences in models of psychological agency; Joan Miller critiques the meaning of the term agency, analyzing the extent to which many popular theories in psychology rest on rather narrow Western models of behavior and effective functioning; Steven Heine calls into question the presumed universality of some forms of cognitive processing; Sheena Iyengar and Sanford DeVoe apply a cross-cultural perspective to better understand intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and the value of choice; Kuo-shu Yang questions the universality of the pervasive and popular "theory of self-actualization" formulated by Abraham Maslow; and finally, Ype Poortinga reexamines not only the cultural boundaries of theory but also the very meaning of the concept of culture itself.

Excerpt

The volume editors for this 49th edition of the Nebraska Symposium are Professors John J. Berman and Virginia Murphy-Berman. John and Ginny did some of the necessary activities leading to this symposium the hard way, since they left our campus for other academic pastures before the symposium meeting itself. Nevertheless, they hosted an exciting meeting and coordinated the building of this superb volume. My thanks to them and to their contributors, and to Claudia Price-Decker for smoothing the path by handling hundreds of details.

As with symposium sessions of the past several years, to allow other scholars to travel to the symposium as participants, we invited posters relevant to the main theme. Since this is a tradition we will continue, we urge you, our readers, to consider such poster submissions when you receive future symposium announcements.

This symposium series is supported largely by funds donated in the memory of Professor Harry K. Wolfe to the University of Nebraska Foundation by the late Professor Cora L. Friedline. This volume, like those of the recent past, is dedicated to the memory of Professor Wolfe, who brought psychology to the University of Nebraska. After studying with Professor Wilhelm Wundt, Professor Wolfe returned to this, his native state, to establish the first undergraduate laboratory . . .

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