Real Human Rights

Real Human Rights

Real Human Rights

Real Human Rights

Excerpt

First, let’s consider the status of the narrative contained in this book and more in general the relationship between truth and politics. The thoughts on human rights and democracy that I will present here are mere proposals and attempts. I do not pretend to proclaim the truth about rights and democracy. If there is any truth in the world at all, it is probably not in the domain of politics, morality and values. It is likely that all we can say about such subjects is mere opinion. However, even if we cannot prove anything or be certain about anything in politics, this does not mean that all opinions are equally valid. There can be good and bad opinions because opinions are based on arguments and reasons, and arguments and reasons can be strong or weak or completely lacking. If all opinions were of the same quality then no one would ever try to convince anyone of anything.

Opinions are, by nature, non-despotic: they cannot be forced on you. The truth can. No one can escape the truth. The laws of physics for example have a despotic character. You have to accept them. Opinions can be accepted or rejected, depending on the force of the arguments for or against, on your personal disposition, your intellectual powers of understanding, etc. Another characteristic of opinions is that they are part of a contradictory world of different opinions. An opinion exists only as long as its contrary also exists. If the latter ceases to exist, then the former becomes what we may call some . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.