A History of Australian Schooling

A History of Australian Schooling

A History of Australian Schooling

A History of Australian Schooling

Synopsis

At a time when schooling is more important than ever for families, and where there is great public concern about educational standards and outcomes, Craig Campbell and Helen Proctor show what is new and what is an echo of older agendas. They offer a comprehensive history of Australian schooling from colonial days to the present, highlighting the ways in which schooling has helped shape society...They identify distinctive features of the Australian education system: the strength of the non-government sector, the experiences of Indigenous children, and the relationship with global trends. From the bush to the burgeoning cities, they consider the impact of schools on children and young people over the decades...'A History of Australian Schooling' is an invaluable resource for anyone involved with Australian schools... 'This unconventional and vibrant history of Australian schools and schooling reads like a fine biography. Landmarks and turning points are interwoven with the pedagogic, social and political shifts that have shaped today's school system. ' - 'Lyndsay Connors, AM FACE'..'a compelling account of public and private provision, one that speaks directly to the current debate' - 'Professor Stuart Macintyre, University of Melbourne'..'a comprehensive, insightful and engaging study of the power of schooling over two centuries' - 'Dr Paul Kilvert, former Chief Executive, South Australian Certificate of Education Board'

Excerpt

The last substantial efforts to write comprehensive histories of Australian schooling occurred in the 1970s—a period of radical educational reform. There was good reason to review the history of Australian education at that time, as great questions associated with access to educational opportunity and the renewal of funding to nongovernment schools after a century of non-funding came to dominate policy debates. The ways in which teaching occurred, the architecture of schools, school and teacher management, assessment practices, relationships between school credentials and the labour market, the ways in which students, parents, teachers, educational institutions, school systems and policy-makers related one to another—all of these issues and more were subjects of reform.

Since the 1970s, the pace of change has never slowed. With the rise of neoliberal-influenced education policies, continual transformation has become a permanent feature of Australian education. There are new school markets. Families are encouraged to think of themselves as informed consumers in competition for educational services, both non-government and government. This post-1970s reform effort has been going long enough now for it to have its own history. Knowledge of this history, along with earlier phases of Australia’s educational history, is essential for those who seek to understand present arrangements—and to plan for the future.

Since the 1970s, there have been important developments in how the history of education has been written. One was to take seriously the differences between histories of education and histories of schooling, which are not the same thing. There are many agencies . . .

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