Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine: A Handbook for Practitioners in Australia and New Zealand

Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine: A Handbook for Practitioners in Australia and New Zealand

Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine: A Handbook for Practitioners in Australia and New Zealand

Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine: A Handbook for Practitioners in Australia and New Zealand

Synopsis

A comprehensive handbook on law and ethics for both the student and professional complementary medicine practitioner, now in its fourth edition
Established as the most widely used reference in the field, Law and Ethics in Complementary Medicine is a comprehensive handbook for professionals, students, and researchers. Covering a wide range of complementary modalities, it deals with legal and ethical issues in clinical relationships and provides practical guidelines for setting up and running a professional practice. Michael Weir systematically outlines the various aspects of the law which impact on clinical practice, including legal obligations to clients, consumer legislation and complaints processes, and professional boundaries. He explains how to navigate professional indemnity insurance, and the steps you need to take in setting up a professional practice from establishing a business name to dealing with employees. He also outlines the role of codes of ethics, and explores how to deal with tricky ethical issues in daily practice. This fourth edition is fully updated and addresses recent changes in regulation and case law, including the introduction of national boards to cover each registered health profession in Australia. For the first time it also covers aspects of regulation of complementary medicine modalities in New Zealand.

Excerpt

It is with pleasure that I provide the 4th edition of this work with Allen & Unwin under a new title. the previous three editions were published under the title Complementary Medicine: Ethics and Law. the regulatory structure for the provision of complementary medicine has undergone a substantial transformation from that applying when the first edition of this book was published in 2000. the scope of practice provisions which had the potential to impact so substantially on complementary medicine practitioners in regard to what was ‘the practice of medicine’ and the broad scope of practice provisions for ‘chiropractic’ and ‘physiotherapy’ have now been removed and replaced with ‘restricted acts’ under the National Law which commenced on 1 July 2010. the only significant restricted act relevant to complementary medicine practitioners is a limitation on the application of cervical spine manipulation which must only be performed by medical practitioners, chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists. This is a national and much more benign regulatory structure for the practice of complementary medicine by unregistered practitioners. This national approach to the regulation of health professions has meant that the state-based professional boards have been replaced by national boards covering each regulated health profession.

From 1 July 2012, traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture will become a national registered profession. As a result of these changes, Chapter 3 Scope of Practice has been extensively researched, rewritten and renamed Restricted Acts and Protected Titles.

The other major legislative amendment has been the introduction from 1 January 2011 of the Australian Consumer Law discussed in Chapter 5. the Australian Consumer Law introduces a nationally consistent scheme in relation to consumer contracts and guarantees in relation to the quality of goods and services which may impact upon complementary medicine practitioners.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.