Modernising the Classics: A Study in Curriculum Development

Modernising the Classics: A Study in Curriculum Development

Modernising the Classics: A Study in Curriculum Development

Modernising the Classics: A Study in Curriculum Development

Synopsis

The Cambridge School Classics Project is widely recognised as one of the most successful of the British curriculum development projects of the 1960s and 1970s. Until now its full story has never been written. Its impact on the way Latin is taught in schools has been remarkable and itsdevelopment of courses in Greek and Roman civilisation have also made an important contribution to the humanities curriculum of schools. The main focus of this historical study is on the origins and operations of the Project during its full-time existence 1966 to 1970, although attention is alsopaid to later developments.

Excerpt

The Cambridge School Classics Project is widely recognised as having been one of the more successful of the British curriculum developments of the 1960s and 1970s. Its impact on the teaching of Latin in schools has been remarkable and its development of courses in Greek and Roman civilisation have helped to lay the foundations for classical elements in the National Curriculum programmes of study for History. From early in its existence, the Project’s work stimulated interest in Europe and North America and, since 1982, an American edition of the Cambridge Latin Course has been published and widely adopted in the United States and Canada.

This historical study of the Cambridge Project concentrates upon the origins and early history of the Project. It has been written by a former teacher of Classics and History in schools who was himself a full-time member of the Project team and who has continued since that time to be closely associated with the Project. The main focus is upon the establishment and operation of the Project during its full-time existence (1966–70). No attempt has been made to tell in detail the history of the Project since 1970, including the revision of the Cambridge Latin Course and important developments that have taken place in other countries, particularly in America. However, the early dissemination of the Project’s thinking and its materials, the evaluation study of 1976 and the extension to the Classical Civilisation developments based in Bristol (1973–8) are all featured in the book.

Towards the end, there is a brief overview of the present position of school Classics, especially in England and Wales following the passage through the British Parliament of the 1988 Education Reform Act. Reference is also made to developments in North America. Few retrospective accounts have, as yet, been published of curriculum development projects sponsored by the Nuffield Foundation and the Schools Council. This history of the Cambridge School Classics Project has been written . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.