Not on Any Map: Essays on Postcoloniality and Cultural Nationalism

Not on Any Map: Essays on Postcoloniality and Cultural Nationalism

Not on Any Map: Essays on Postcoloniality and Cultural Nationalism

Not on Any Map: Essays on Postcoloniality and Cultural Nationalism

Synopsis

Why is the world in which we live so ruled by the idea of the nation? What effect have the newly independent nations of the last fifty years had on the old world order? Are countries in a post-imperial world the same now as they were in the time of imperialism? Not On Any Map seeks to answer these questions and explores the wide-ranging issues surrounding nationalism and postcoloniality. The collection draws on the work of scholars and creative producers from all over the world who explore the idea of the nation in a variety of postcolonial contexts. These include a piece from Wilson Harris' work-in-progress, as well as other work on literary nationalism, media arts promotion, the use of the indigene in tourism, commercial cinema, immigration, developments in communication and technology, sport and issues affecting nations both in the former colonial centres and the ex-colonies.

Excerpt

Stuart Murray

This book is about the ideology and the practice of cultural nationalism in postcolonial contexts. It has a number of purposes. Firstly it offers a wide-ranging analysis of the effects of nationalism in the former colonies of the world and the old colonial centres. The essays in this collection come from a variety of disciplines, and each of them is rooted firmly in the local conditions it seeks to articulate: the specifics and complexities of the organization of settler and bicultural nationalisms in New Zealand are a long way from the debates surrounding the issues of immigration from ex-British colonies into the United Kingdom. Likewise, the essays make use of a number of theoretical approaches. But they do so in the belief that there is much to be gained from the subsequent juxtaposition of these localities; that, when we choose to put these postcolonial contexts together, we will be able to approach some wider conclusions as to the nature of nationalism and postcoloniality more generally.

The discursive method of the collection points to its second objective: to illuminate the ever increasing complexity displayed by the modern manifestations of the national and the postcolonial. That complexity can only be addressed by multidisciplined studies which recognize the necessity to move beyond traditional methodological boundaries. As these essays show, the nature of the modern postcolonial world order involves the latest innovations in technology, contemporary displays of State power, the reworking and understanding of history and myth, as well as the various aesthetics that have evolved as forms of representation of these disparate cultures. If we are to understand this most . . .

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