Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies

Synopsis

Praise for Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies

"One of the most fruitful aspects of the encounter between classical Buddhist knowledge and modern science has been the emergence of new therapeutic and educational approaches that integrate contemplative practice, such as mindfulness, and contemporary psychology methods, such as those of cognitive therapy. The systematic approach of this book, wherein the insights of both classical Buddhist and contemporary psychology are integrated, represents a most beneficial and powerful method of ensuring a healthy mind and heart."
- His Holiness the Dalai Lama

"What has been missing in the midst of partisan battles between orthodox CBT therapists and enthusiastic proponents of newer acceptance/mindfulness approaches is a reasoned, scientifically grounded discourse that would help researchers and clinicians alike sort through the various claims and counterclaims. This book, skillfully conceived and edited by James Herbert and Evan Forman, provides just such a sober and open-minded appraisal of a trend that has sometimes suffered both from too much hype from one side and too sweeping a rejection by the other. This volume encourages careful consideration of both positions and can advance evidence-based psychosocial therapy both conceptually and procedurally to the benefit of all."
- From the Foreword by Gerald C. Davison, PhD, University of Southern California

Acceptance and Mindfulness in Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Understanding and Applying the New Therapies brings together a renowned group of leading figures in CBT who address key issues and topics, including:

  • Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy

  • Metacognitive therapy

  • Mindfulness-based stress reduction

  • Dialectical behavior therapy

  • Understanding acceptance and commitment therapy in context

Excerpt

It seems that the acceptance and mindfulness concept has suddenly become pervasive in clinical psychology and related fields. Judging from the barrage of flyers I receive each week, it seems that one can hardly buy a psychological book these days without the terms “mindfulness” or “acceptance” in its title. This is especially true of self-help and other psychology trade books.

But the concept is increasingly found also in serious scientific articles and in convention programs, including – and especially! – those of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, a 45-year old organization that eschewed cognitive constructs in its earliest years, defining the field solely in terms of classical and operant conditioning. This is the behavior therapy that I cut my teeth on in the early 1960s, though even back then there were signs that equating behavior therapy with “the conditioning therapies” was unproductively constraining and not reflective of what self-identified behavior therapists actually did or even how they thought about what they did.

When I was learning behavior therapy and assessment in graduate school from Lazarus, Bandura, and Mischel, there were three kinds of reactions from nonbehavioral colleagues to the sometimes hypomanic pronouncements of the advocates of this “new wave.” The first was “You are treating symptoms, not the disorder/disease itself and therefore you are likely to do harm.” Or second, “I don’t believe your reports of efficacy and effectiveness.” Or third, coming from those who believed that the new approach had some promise, “Well, I’ve been doing ‘that’ for some time, only using different language to talk about the effectiveness of my ministrations.”

I will freely admit that my reactions to the acceptance/mindfulness trend in cognitive behavior therapy often fall into the third category. To be specific, I sometimes find myself believing that the acceptance/mindfulness rhetoric represents less a third wave or . . .

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