Handbook of Child and Adolescent Drug and Substance Abuse: Pharmacological, Developmental, and Clinical Considerations

Handbook of Child and Adolescent Drug and Substance Abuse: Pharmacological, Developmental, and Clinical Considerations

Handbook of Child and Adolescent Drug and Substance Abuse: Pharmacological, Developmental, and Clinical Considerations

Handbook of Child and Adolescent Drug and Substance Abuse: Pharmacological, Developmental, and Clinical Considerations

Excerpt

Children and adolescents throughout North America, regardless of age, culture, education, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, or socioeconomic status, may be exposed to and may actively use the various drugs and substances of abuse (see Figure P.1, Table P.1) in a variety of ways that adversely affect their health, safety, and well-being (see Figure P. 2). Their exposure to and use of these drugs and substances of abuse also may adversely affect the health, safety, and well-being of their families, including siblings, and that of their friends and schoolmates and the larger communities, including the schools and neighborhoods, of which they are a part. Consequently, all those who work to promote the optimal growth and development of children and adolescents— child and adolescent psychiatrists and psychologists; community health, mental health, and school nurses; family physicians; family therapists; home health-care workers; juvenile justice workers; midwives; pediatric nurse practitioners; pediatricians; pharmacists; school counselors; school psychologists; and social workers—require an unbiased and specialized reference source that presents current research, across the lifespan, concerning the prevalence and characteristics of child and adolescent exposure to and use of the drugs and substances of abuse in North America.

These health and social care professionals also require a reference text that provides up-to-date clinical pharmacological informa-

The term “psychotropics” refers to all exogenous sub
stances (i.e., chemicals, including plant products, drugs,
and xenobiotics) that: (1) elicit a direct effect on the central
nervous system resulting in changes in cognition, learn
ing, memory, behavior, perception, or affect; and (2) are
used specifically for these major effects. The psycho
tropics can be further divided . . .

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