Maximising the Benefits of Psychotherapy: A Practice-Based Evidence Approach

Maximising the Benefits of Psychotherapy: A Practice-Based Evidence Approach

Maximising the Benefits of Psychotherapy: A Practice-Based Evidence Approach

Maximising the Benefits of Psychotherapy: A Practice-Based Evidence Approach

Synopsis

Maximising the Benefits of Psychotherapy critiques Evidence-Based Practice and describes other approaches to improving the effectiveness of therapy, such as Practice-Based Evidence and the use of client feedback. The authors include a summary of key research findings and an accessible guide to applying these ideas to therapeutic practice.
  • Puts forward a critique of existing research claiming that certain psychotherapy programmes are more effective than others in treating specific disorders
  • Includes an accessible summary of key research findings, a practical introduction to a practice-based evidence approach, and a series of detailed case studies
  • Offers a timely alternative to the prevailing wisdom in the mental health field by challenging the practical logic of the Evidence-Based Practice approach
  • Reviews the empirical evidence examining the effects of client feedback on psychotherapy outcomes

Excerpt

Why,’ said the Dodo, ‘the best way to explain it is to do it.’ (Lewis
Carroll [1896] Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland)

In October 2009, Newsweek magazine in the United States published an article by Sharon Begley called ‘ignoring the evidence’. in it, psychotherapy researchers are quoted berating psychotherapists for taking no notice of science and instead treating patients with whatever intervention they are familiar. There is a ‘widening gulf between researcher and clinician’. One researcher, Timothy Baker, argues that clinicians ‘give more weight to their personal experiences than to science’. the tone of the article is that this is clearly a bad thing. the implication is that science has progressed since the early days of therapy, and that we now know more about what therapies work and why. Clinicians should, therefore, keep up to date in their knowledge and change their practice accordingly.

If this is all true, it is pretty damning. the truth, though, is a bit more complicated.

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