Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer: Gently Turning Towards

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer: Gently Turning Towards

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer: Gently Turning Towards

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer: Gently Turning Towards

Synopsis

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Cancer presents an eight-week course for MBCT which has been tried and tested over ten years of clinical use, and is targeted specifically for people with cancer.
  • There is growing evidence of mindfulness as a successful and cost-effective intervention for reducing the negative psychological impact of cancer and treatment
  • Draws upon the author's experience of working with people with cancer, and her own recent experience of using mindfulness with cancer diagnosis and treatment
  • Stories from cancer patients illustrate the learning and key themes of the course
  • Includes new short practices and group processes developed by the author

Excerpt

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is already well-established as a treatment for the prevention of recurrent depression. Now, in this important book, Trish Bartley describes how, over a ten-year period, she has extended and developed the original mbct framework to meet the needs of cancer patients. the impetus for this mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for cancer (MBCT-Ca) programme came from Trish’s own first personal encounter with cancer (she has had a further encounter while actually writing this book). This experience, together with her involvement with teaching and training in mbct from the early days of its development, make Trish uniquely suited to the task she has undertaken.

In common with all mindfulness-based approaches to the relief of distress, MBCT-Ca is grounded in the view that our suffering actually arises more from the way in which we relate to experiences of pain, discomfort and difficulty than to the experiences themselves. This view suggests the possibility that we can substantially reduce distress by learning a different relationship to unpleasant and unwanted experiences, even if we can do little to change the experiences themselves. Anyone who works with cancer, who has cancer themselves, or who cares about someone close to them who has cancer, will know only too well that cancer and its treatment can offer one opportunity after another to experience pain, discomfort, anger, fear, and despair. It can seem wholly natural and understandable that we might be very distressed by these experiences, to the point where any suggestion that ‘there may be another way to relate to these experiences’ has to be approached with great sensitivity. It is here that Trish’s direct personal experience of being both a cancer patient and a teacher of, literally, hundreds of cancer patients passing through the MBCT-Ca programme are so helpful.

This fertile interface, coupled with Trish’s personal background in meditative disciplines, has led very naturally to a focus on the heart quality of compassion as a central feature of MBCT-Ca. the emphasis on opening to . . .

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