The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire

Excerpt

If Lisbeth Salander is the new voice of reason, then truth “can be a moody bitch.”

I suppose Stieg Larsson approved of this droll characterization from his hard-boiled, coffee-swilling journalist, Mikael Blomkvist, but it’s a bit of a problem for old-school philosophers.

Ever since Socrates, philosophers have been enamored with the belief that Truth (with a capital T) is unchanging, indivisible, and immortal. For more than two thousand years, we’ve taken comfort in that worldview. “Truth is beauty, beauty truth,” said the poet John Keats in 1819, studiously pondering a Grecian urn.

Yet Lisbeth is not classically beautiful. Created in the image of another great Swedish sleuth, Pippi Longstocking, Larsson’s heroine is “pale and anorexic,” “a stray cat,” with red hair dyed black that, even when cut short, “still stuck out in all directions.” Dragan Armansky, the levelheaded boss of Milton Security, eloquently describes his first impressions . . .

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