Coping with Work Stress: A Review and Critique

Coping with Work Stress: A Review and Critique

Coping with Work Stress: A Review and Critique

Coping with Work Stress: A Review and Critique

Synopsis

Coping with Work Stress: A Review and Critique highlights current research relating to the coping strategies of individuals and organizations, and provides best practice techniques for dealing with the growing epidemic of stress and lack of overall well-being at work.
  • Reviews and critiques the most current research focusing on workplace stress
  • Provides 'best practice' techniques for dealing with stress at the workplace
  • Extends beyond stress to cover broader issues of well-being at work

Excerpt

This book is about coping. More particularly, it is about coping with work stress. For over 50 years, researchers have been interested in coping. Over that time the ‘dramatic proliferation’ of research (Folkman & Moskowitz 2004), while, at times, producing debate and disappointment about progress, has maintained such a momentum that it is now probably one of the most extensively explored subjects in contemporary psychology (Somerfield & McCrae 2000). This sustained interest could be explained in terms of coping’s relevance to people (Aldwin 2000) and to society more generally (Snyder 1999), or because understanding how people cope is in itself intrinsically appealing. However, it is more likely to reflect the fact that the better we understand coping, the better we understand stress and how to manage it. Its allure is not just as an important explanatory variable (Folkman & Moskowitz 2000) but because it is fundamental to our understanding of the stress process.

Coping, as Zeidner and Saklofske (1996) point out, is more than simple adjustment. Its meaning extends beyond issues of basic survival to express the very essence of individual growth and development, allowing us to thrive in an ever-changing world. It is at the very heart of the human change process (Snyder 1999) and inextricably linked to the quality of our lives. Nevertheless, despite the fundamental importance of coping, the ‘boundless enthusiasm’ for coping research (Somerfield & McCrae 2000) and the fact that coping as a topic has been explored by a substantial number of researchers from an array of fields (Snyder 1999), coping research is not without its controversies, disappointments and questioning . . .

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