The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men

The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men

The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men

The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men

Synopsis

Drawing on an extensive body of literature, The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men presents an historical account of the policy changes that have led to rehabilitation programmes for male perpetrators of intimate partner violence within the criminal justice system.
  • Presents a review of the current state of male partner-violence theory and related intervention programmes in the UK
  • Draws on both national and international literature within the field
  • Provides an overview of the theoretical foundation behind current approaches to the rehabilitation of partner-violent men
  • Offers an appraisal of the effectiveness of current practices??and directions for future advances in intervention and evaluation science

Excerpt

Violence within intimate relationships is by no means a modern phenomenon. In fact the earliest documented British case of violence against a woman by her husband is that of Margaret Neffield from York in 1395 (described by Lunn, 1991, cited in Mullender 1996). Margaret appeared with witnesses in front of the Ecclesiastical court and presented a case that her husband had attacked her with a dagger, inflicting several wounds including broken bones. Despite the supporting statements from the witnesses, the court found that a legitimate case for a judicial separation had not been made. The final ruling was that Margaret should continue to live with her husband (Lunn, 1991).

Although this account is more than 600 years old, the nature of the violence used, injury inflicted, and attitudes of the judiciary towards such behaviours, are representative of domestic violence scenarios occurring well into the 1990s. Indeed, even today, in the early part of the 21st century, the national and local press is littered with stories of domestic violence in which decisions (or lack thereof) taken by statutory agencies lead to the release of a known victim back into the hands of her abuser with fatal consequences. It is perhaps not surprising that media coverage of domestic violence issues is dominated by such stories, given the media’s general preoccupation with ‘bad news’. Although these stories do well to highlight domestic violence as an ongoing social issue, identify persisting flaws within the current system and exert pressure on relevant parties, they fail to acknowledge the extent to which the statutory response to domestic violence has changed.

Indeed, when considering the title of this book The Rehabilitation of Partner-Violent Men, it is clear that a great deal has changed in Britain since the fourteenth-century case of Margaret Neffield, with regard to society’s response to domestic violence in . . .

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