Administrative Reform in Developing Nations

Administrative Reform in Developing Nations

Administrative Reform in Developing Nations

Administrative Reform in Developing Nations

Synopsis

Under pressure from the World Bank, the International Monetary Funds and the World Trade Organization governments of both industrialized and less developed nations have undertaken extensive reforms and reorganization to streamline their public sectors. This volume, with chapters written by authorities from around the world, provides information on administrative reform in varied nations. Following an introduction, which sets a theoretical framework, the book contains sections devoted to Asia, the Near/Middle East, Africa, and a comparison of East/South Europe and Asia.

Administrative reform has become a widespread challenge to national and sub-national governments around the globe. Under pressure from the World Bank, the International Monetary Funds and the World Trade Organization governments of both industrialized and less developed nations have undertaken extensive reforms and reorganization to streamline their public sectors. This volume, with chapters written by authorities from around the world, provides information on administrative reform in varied nations.

Developing nations face acute problems on a daily basis, making administrative reform an essential function of public administration. With chapters devoted to experiences in such nations as Korea, India, Iran, Turkey, the Arab States, Nigeria, and South Africa, this volume sheds valuable light on administrative reform in developing countries and provides lessons for future policy actions.

Excerpt

As a worldwide phenomenon, administrative reform has been a widespread challenge to almost all national and sub-national governments around the globe. Unlike the reform movements of the earlier decades of the twentieth century, which emphasized institution building, bureaucratization, nationalization, and a wide variety of organizational and administrative capacity building for national and economic development, the recent global phenomenon of administrative reform has been in the opposite direction: reversing the traditional role of government, the state, and public administration institutions into one that promotes a private, corporate-driven marketplace dominated by business elites.

Privatization, commercialization, marketization, and contracting out, together with a number of institutional changes, promote this new ideological trend on a global scale. Under the direct influence of globally dominant superpowers such as the United States and other Western donors, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization have forced almost all less developed nations to structurally adjust their governments and administrative systems to these new global trends that promote globalization and enhance the power and profit of globalizing corporate elites.

In this context of globalizing pressure, governments of both industrialized and less developed nations have engaged in extensive administrative reforms and reorganizations to streamline their public sectors by shrinking their size, function, and activities, which for decades have benefited common citizens everywhere. The need to reform traditional governmental organization and administration is no secret to anyone, and reform is always essential to improve administrative machineries, to reduce or eliminate duplication and waste, and to increase productivity in public sector management. However, the big push originating from the United States and Britain in the 1980s to privatize, marketize . . .

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