International Handbook of Suicide Prevention Research, Policy and Practice

International Handbook of Suicide Prevention Research, Policy and Practice

International Handbook of Suicide Prevention Research, Policy and Practice

International Handbook of Suicide Prevention Research, Policy and Practice

Synopsis

The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention showcases the latest cutting-edge research from the world?s leading authorities, and highlights policy and practice implications for the prevention of suicide.
  • Brings together the world?s leading authorities on suicidal behaviour, renowned for their suicide prevention research, policy and practice
  • Addresses the key questions of why people attempt suicide, the best interventions, treatments and care for those at risk, and the key international challenges in trying to prevent suicide
  • Describes up-to-date, theoretically-derived and evidence-based research and practice from across the globe, which will have implications across countries, cultures and the lifespan

Excerpt

Suicidology is the science of suicide and suicide prevention (Maris, 1993). As the scale of suicide has become more widely recognized, so has the discipline and so have national and international efforts to tackle this tragic phenomenon. Although the growth in suicido logy is welcome, our understanding of suicide is still fragmented and incomplete. Suicide is now a major public health concern across the globe, accounting for approximately one million deaths per annum (World Health Organization, 2010). Indeed, it is the tenth leading cause of death worldwide (Hawton & van Heeringen, 2009), the third leading cause of death among 15–44 years olds, and the second leading cause of death among 10–24 year olds in some countries (World Health Organization, 2010). Although the international data on non-fatal suicide attempts are limited, as they are not consistently recorded across countries and are often limited to hospital-treated suicide attempts, it is estimated that suicide attempts are 20 to 30 times more common than completed suicides (Wasserman, 2001).

In this Handbook, we try to understand why people attempt suicide and what can be done to make death by suicide less likely by harnessing the expertise of some 80 suicidologists from across the world. This Handbook offers kaleidoscopic views on the multitude of suicidal determinants and the multifaceted nature of suicide prevention. It should appeal to anyone with an interest in the comprehension and prevention of suicide. To this end, one of the guiding principles of this volume is to improve our understanding of the relationship between attempted suicide and completed suicide. A more comprehensive understanding of this relationship is important not only for theoretical and conceptual reasons, but also because secondary prevention interventions are frequently directed at those who attempt suicide. Any national or international suicide prevention strategy, to be effective, must be able to engage those who have attempted suicide. Although this may . . .

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