International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice, and Research

International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice, and Research

International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice, and Research

International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice, and Research

Synopsis

International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice and Research provides the first truly global perspective on the assessment and treatment of sex offenders.
  • Presents a comprehensive overview of current theories and practices relating to the assessment and treatment of sex offenders throughout the world, including the US, Europe, and Australasia
  • Covers all the major developments in the areas of risk assessment, treatment, and management
  • Includes chapters written by internationally respected practitioners and researchers experienced in working with sexual offenders such as Bill Marshall, Ruth Mann, Karl Hanson and Jayson Ware

Excerpt

The modern development of sexual offender assessment and treatment began in the mid-1960s with the advent of behavior therapy, with rather slow growth until the beginning of the 1980s. Most of the development in these early years occurred in North America. A conference in California in 1981 provided the impetus for a rapid expansion of research and the development of an everbroadening range of issues addressed in treatment. In particular the introduction of the Relapse Prevention (RP) model by Janice Marques (1982) was seized upon by therapists eager to have a structured and an agreed-upon approach to the treatment of these offenders.

The RP model, and the more general cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) of the 1980s, were essentially rather negatively oriented in that they focused primarily on identifying deficits in sexual offenders and on eliminating deviance and in generating lists of places, persons, behaviors, and thoughts to be avoided. With the publication of Anna Salter’s (1988) influential book the negative nature of sexual offender treatment, particularly in the United States, became more exaggerated. Salter claimed that all sexual offenders lied, not only about aspects of their offenses, but about all aspects of their lives. Accordingly Salter recommended that therapists take an aggressive confrontational approach to treating sexual offenders.

In the 1990s several things happened that began a change in this negative confrontational approach. Mann, Webster, Schofield, and Marshall (2004) demonstrated that, in contradiction to RP theory, approach goals were more readily maintained whereas avoidance goals were not sustained. Ward’s (Laws, Hudson, & Ward, 2000; Ward & Hudson, 1996; Ward, Hudson & Siegert . . .

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