Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach to Global Ethics

Synopsis

This popular textbook has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect recent global developments, whilst retaining its unique and compelling narrative-style approach. Using ancient stories from diverse religions, it explores a broad range of important and complex moral issues, resulting in a truly reader-friendly and comparative introduction to religious ethics.
  • A thoroughly revised and expanded new edition of this popular textbook, yet retains the unique narrative-style approach which has proved so successful with students
  • Considers the ways in which ancient stories from diverse religions, such as the Bhagavad Gita and the lives of Jesus and Buddha, have provided ethical orientation in the modern world
  • Updated to reflect recent discussions on globalization and its influence on cross-cultural and comparative ethics, economic dimensions to ethics, Gandhian traditions, and global ethics in an age of terrorism
  • Expands coverage of Asian religions, quest narratives, the religious and philosophical approach to ethics in the West, and considers Chinese influences on Thich Nhat Hanh's Zen Buddhism, and Augustine's Confessions
  • Accompanied by an instructor's manual (coming soon, see http://www.wiley.com/go/fasching) which shows how to use the book in conjunction with contemporary films

Excerpt

In 1972 I was a graduate student in the doctoral program at Syracuse University, accustomed to spending a week or two at Mount Saviour Monastery in Elmira New York during the summer. From my first encounter with these Benedictine monks they taught me the profound meaning of “hospitality.” It was there, under the spiritual guidance of Father Alexander, that I was first introduced to zazen – Buddhist meditation as a form of spiritual practice a Christian might profitably engage in.

The monastic custom is to have spiritual reading done aloud by one of the monks while the rest take their meals. During my visit that summer the spiritual reading was from a newly published book, The Way of All the Earth, by John S. Dunne of Notre Dame University. I was stunned, overwhelmed, and entranced by this book and immediately went out and bought a copy upon returning to Syracuse. Its thesis, that a new way of being religious was emerging in an age of globalization, one that he described as “passing over” and “coming back,” became for me the organizing insight of my own life’s work, including this volume. So I gratefully dedicate this book to John S. Dunne and the monks of Mount Saviour. Without their influence it would never have been written. It is also dedicated to the memory of the man I worked for and with at that time, Dr. John H. McCombe, then Dean of Hendricks Chapel at Syracuse University. He is for me a model of the very practice of “passing over” that Dunne advocates.

It is hard for me to believe the first edition of Comparative Religious Ethics: A Narrative Approach was published a full decade ago in 2001. Despite being a textbook, this book really functions as the third part of a four volume series on religion and global ethics that I undertook. The first volume, Narrative Theology after Auschwitz: From Alienation to Ethics, appeared almost two decades ago (in 1992) and was followed by The Ethical Challenge of Auschwitz and Hiroshima a . . .

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