Virgil

Virgil

Virgil

Virgil

Synopsis

Virgil offers undergraduates, graduate students and general readers a comprehensive and carefully balanced introduction to the works and literary reception of Virgil.
  • Offers a fresh, comprehensive introduction to Virgil in translation
  • Explores the historical context in which Virgil wrote and lived
  • Discusses the manuscript tradition of Virgil
  • Traces the poet's literary influence on later authors and his impact on the arts
  • Includes suggestions for further readings

Excerpt

Virgil is to ancient literature what Michelangelo is to Renaissance art; remove the adjectives, and the sentence may still be true. I am privileged to be one of those who study Virgil and to have come to know him, at least the Virgil who is his text.

For this project I owe a great measure of debt to my friends and colleagues. Many have read portions or all of this manuscript. I sincerely thank my colleague Julia Hejduk, who offered feedback, challenged ideas, checked translations — all of it summa cum caritate. To Jeff Hunt, whose comments were truly invaluable, I owe more that I can say. Jenny, his wife, also read much of the manuscript, improving it in both style and substance. Kenneth Jones and Richard Durán also offered welcome feedback on select chapters. I thank, too, Antony Augoustakis, Simon Burris, Susan Colón, Tommye Lou Davis, Jeff Fish, Brent Froberg, Daniel Hanchey, Tim Heckenlively, David Jeffrey, Steven Jones, Michael Sloan, and Amy Vail for their encouragement and informal exchange of ideas. I am also grateful to Darin Davis, for allowing me to present some of my ideas to Baylor’s Crane Scholars. Thelma Mathews is deserving of my deepest gratitude for performing endless tasks on my behalf. I thank Paulette Edwards for extricating me from much administrative paperwork, and Doris Kelly for taming my schedule.

I received much aid from other colleagues and friends. Gareth Williams received me warmly at Columbia University, where much of this book was written, securing me access to Butler Library. I also thank Joe Farrell who assisted me logistically in Philadelphia when I researched in Penn ‘s Van Pelt Library; there I met Dan Traister, Curator of Research Services in the Rare Book & Manuscript Library. I am grateful to him (and to my Baylor colleague, David White, who introduced us) for assistance in my research on manuscripts; Nico Knauer ‘s advice on this topic was also valuable.

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