Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States

Synopsis

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States details the origins and evolution of the movement of people from Mexico into the United States from the first significant flow across the border at the turn of the twentieth century up to the present day.
  • Considers the issues from the perspectives of both the United States and Mexico
  • Offers a reasoned assessment of the factors that drive Mexican immigration, explains why so many of the policies enacted in Washington have only worsened the problem, and suggests what policy options might prove more effective
  • Argues that the problem of Mexican immigration can only be solved if Mexico and the United States work together to reduce the disequilibrium that propels Mexican immigrants to the United States

Excerpt

Among the hundreds of thousands of people who cross surreptitiously into the United States each year, Mexicans enjoy the distinction of being the only ones whose nationality is mentioned by name in official documents. All the rest, no matter where in the world they hail from, are lumped into the unglamorous category of “Other Than Mexicans,” or “OTMs” in Border Patrol parlance.

The reason is obvious: Mexicans make up about 93 percent of those surreptitious border crossers. Anyone picking up this book is surely well aware that migration from Mexico is, and has long been, a “hot button issue.” Immigration in general has always been irresistible to demagogues, for it involves, or is perceived to involve, vital matters such as race and ethnicity, nationality, national security, language, culture, economics, health, law, and community. Those whose personal or political interests are served by igniting fear and hatred have always found immigrants to be convenient targets. Anti-immigrant activists condemn immigrants as strangers among us, inscrutable “others” invading our safe, comfortable, homogeneous spaces, burdening budgets, spreading crime and disease, refusing to learn “our language” or to practice “our ways.”

Mexicans are merely the latest immigrants to receive such treatment, but they are by no means alone. In a letter dated 1753, no less a

Beyond Borders: A History of Mexican Migration to the United States
By Timothy J. Henderson
© 2011 Timothy J. Henderson

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