All Crises Are Global: Managing to Escape Chaos

All Crises Are Global: Managing to Escape Chaos

All Crises Are Global: Managing to Escape Chaos

All Crises Are Global: Managing to Escape Chaos

Synopsis

From the Enron scandal to the Ebola virus scare, from oil spills to acts of terrorism, crises scar our age. And whether it's an expensive product recall or a deadly airplane crash, any crisis can turn into chaos - unless there's an effective management response plan in place. All Crises Are Global provides the basics of an effective crisis-management plan. Marion Pinsdorf gives managers the tools and sensitivity to deal with the catastrophic effects of a crisis - whether it touches on the organization itself, the media, competitors, partners, government, or victims. Filled with real-world examples of successes and failures (from the Arthur Andersen meltdown to the attacks of September 11), Pinsdorf shows how to plan for, manage, monitor, and mitigate the effects of crises large and small. Spread instantaneously to a litigious world by global media, crises can no longer be contained or controlled - only anticipated and managed. Executives can manage the impact of even large-scale events by quickly taking responsibility for the human and financial costs of an organization's mistakes. Pinsdorf provides techniques for building smart organizations that react quickly before problems escalate into crises. Practical, tested, and wise, this book helps all managers look for trouble spots and deal with them effectively.

Excerpt

Crises were global long before the World Trade Center (WTC) tragedy. Dutch tulip mania in the seventeenth century diminished wealth worldwide. Plagues spread along trade routes on land and water. Twenty years ago, one local product poisoning—Tylenol—set standards worldwide for safety and expectations for recalls and gave copycats deadly ideas. Terrorism is always global, from planning through execution, and gains international public attention immediately.

Rapid global movement of money, information, garbage, diseases, and people erases borders and control. China could not contain the strife in Tiananmen Square nor the secret of SARS. Neither could the then Soviet Union hide the Chernobyl reactor meltdown, nor Russia the Kursk tragedy. Nor Zaire, Ebola. Quebec fires had New Yorkers smarting from soot and haze that mocked borders. Canada’s smoke didn’t stop at border customs. Nor will weather patterns, global warming, droughts, floods, and infestations. Communications, particularly during crises, knock down barriers and cruelly sort out the competent leaders from their fearful, dinosaur-like counterparts, and reality from wishful thinking.

As technology metastasizes, as systems increasingly interconnect, fragility grows apace. The 1993 WTC bombing frightened crisis managers with the realization of how well-placed explosives could knock out transportation, television, and Wall Street, to name but a few. But like other worldwide tracelines of trouble, it was largely ignored. In the 1990s, one threatening call to air controllers in the five major metropolitan New York airports hobbled the entire U.S. air-transport system and some international flights. The same with computer glitches: recently, a squirrel chewing through a cable immobilized the entire NASDAQ stock exchange.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.