Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native

Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native

Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native

Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native

Synopsis

A collection of eight critical essays on Hardy's novel "The Return of the Native" arranged in chronological order of publication.

Thomas Hardy categorized his first major novel, The Return of the Native, as one of "character and environment." The looming setting of Egdon Heath provides the fatalistic backdrop for the story of a mother-son-wife triangle (Mrs. Yeobright, Clym Yeobright, Eustacia Vye) and their inability to escape the complexities of their loves. Here he pits the force of the Heath against the action of his protagonists to find the human place in the context of nature. Unlike the realistic characters of such nineteenth-century novelists as Eliot and Gaskell, Hardy's people are extreme embodiments of elemental passions. The characters and the imposing presence of Egdon Heath move the novel toward a new expressionist and symbolist fiction.

Thomas Hardy's The Return of the Native is one of over 100 volumes in the "Modern Critical Interpretations" series, edited and introduced by Harold Bloom and published by Chelsea House. Taken together, these volumes represent a comprehensive collection of the best current criticism of the most widely read poems, novels, stories, and dramas of the Western World.

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