What CEOs Expect from Corporate Training: Building Workplace Learning and Performance Initiatives That Advance Organizational Goals

What CEOs Expect from Corporate Training: Building Workplace Learning and Performance Initiatives That Advance Organizational Goals

What CEOs Expect from Corporate Training: Building Workplace Learning and Performance Initiatives That Advance Organizational Goals

What CEOs Expect from Corporate Training: Building Workplace Learning and Performance Initiatives That Advance Organizational Goals

Synopsis

"Training is about improving overall organizational performance, and no individual is more accountable for a company's performance than its CEO. It follows, then, that Workplace Learning and Performance professionals (a.k.a. trainers) must learn what chief executives hope to achieve through their company's training efforts, and that they must satisfy the expectations of those executives and other key stakeholders.

What CEOs Expect From Corporate Training is based on extensive interviews with CEOs across a myriad of industries, and reflects their ideas about how effective training can help achieve corporate objectives. To help readers apply these crucial insights to their own efforts, the authors have created a conceptual map of behaviors and relationships, plus a selection of practical worksheets, checklists, and other tools.

Unlike previous work based on what trainers believe they should be doing, What CEOs Expect From Corporate Training directly identifies the training imperatives defined by CEOs and the results they demand."

Excerpt

Sitting atop the pyramids of vast organizations that sometimes wield more economic clout than many nations, CEOs are the embodiment of the American dream. They are usually rich, powerful, and influential. As a result, many people are fascinated by CEOs and want to learn from them. This fascination has made bestsellers of books by (or about) former General Electric CEO Jack Welch, former Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca, and even former Remington Chairman Victor Kiam. The general public wants to know what CEOs, company presidents, and chairmen of the board think on a range of issues. Of course, so do employees who work in organizations controlled by these influential leaders.

For many years, CEOs and board members have used a version of the politically correct phrase “people are our most important assets” in board meetings, stockholder meetings, and annual reports. Research has generally proven this statement to be true. Organizations investing more than their competitors in training and innovative human resource practices tend to outperform their competitors. (And yet, in the words of the CEO of a Pennsylvania-based manufacturer, “training really suffers when we go through some tough economic times. It is an easy expense to slash. Everybody gives lip service to it.”)

Although research has been done on CEO opinions of human resource management (HRM) practitioners, general manager opinions of HRM practitioners, and CEO roles in organization-sponsored training, relatively little research has focused on CEO opinions of Workplace Learning and Performance (WLP) professionals. For readers unfamiliar with the term WLP, suffice it to say that this phrase represents the most recent, research-based thinking about the roles that should be played and the competencies that should be demon-

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