One Foot out the Door: How to Combat the Psychological Recession That's Alienating Employees and Hurting American Business

One Foot out the Door: How to Combat the Psychological Recession That's Alienating Employees and Hurting American Business

One Foot out the Door: How to Combat the Psychological Recession That's Alienating Employees and Hurting American Business

One Foot out the Door: How to Combat the Psychological Recession That's Alienating Employees and Hurting American Business

Synopsis

800-CEO-READ Business Book Awards for 2007 (category: Human Resources/Organizational Development)

Library Journal's Best Business Books for 2007

CEO Refresher The Best Books of 2007

As many as two-thirds of our employees are either actively looking for new jobs or merely going through the motions at their current jobs. Fearful and feeling vulnerable after years of watching friends get laid off, they expect the worst to happen, and they see no reason to give it their all. This phenomenon, identified by renowned author Judith M. Bardwick as "the psychological recession," can have a devastating effect on a company's financial health.

Based on extensive research showing how costly bad management really is, this eye-opening book offers concrete prescriptions for combating alarming trends such as high turnover, low productivity, and lackluster performance, including techniques for:

• strengthening the bonds of trust and respect between managers and employees

• customizing working conditions and rewards for individual employees

• hiring for the "best fit" between the organization's core culture and the personal qualities and priorities of the individual

Using hard numbers and current studies that prove the direct connection between a company's financial performance and its employees' commitment, this book is a wake-up call to organizations desperately needing to restore the broken spirits at the heart of their companies, and enhance their bottom lines.

Excerpt

For most of the twentieth century, American businesses were fat, dumb, and happy. American products dominated their industries, corporate treasuries were rich, and the word “global” was never heard outside thirdgrade geography classrooms.

Of course, many companies were brought to their knees during the 1930s, but then World War ii changed everything. the American economy took off on a spectacular trajectory that dominated for decades.

American businesses had no real competition. the same two oceans that had protected us from military invasion also protected us from economic competition. in addition, the industrial infrastructure of Japan and much of Europe had been destroyed during the war. While they struggled to rebuild, American economic dominance soared.

In this period of American hegemony, large American . . .

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