The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition: Washington Theological Union Symposium Papers 2001

The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition: Washington Theological Union Symposium Papers 2001

The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition: Washington Theological Union Symposium Papers 2001

The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition: Washington Theological Union Symposium Papers 2001

Excerpt

A wonderful contemporary experience is the retrieval, indeed the renaissance, of Franciscan scholarship available in symposia, workshops, and a host of books and journals. As a student in the mid-1950s, when I first came to read the Franciscan tradition, only a few cherished classics were available. The works of Jorgenson, Felder, the graphic genius of Leonard Von Matt, and the ever-delightful Chesterton come to mind. At that time I was introduced to biographies of St. Francis and folklore about the tradition, with the hope that these would respond to my searching queries. They did not. I—and others—wanted more. Sound scholarly studies, critical historiography, systematic theology rooted in scriptural, philosophical, and linguistic advances were soon offered us in the second half of the next decade. Little did we know then that the splendid scholars of that day—Philotheus Boehner, Kajetan Esser, Allan Wolter, the two Brady brothers, Ignatius and Mel, not to mention the ecumenical contribution of many Anglican scholars, most notably Bishop John Moorman, would soon create a strong foundation for this present age. Not only did the scholars of the 50s and 60s spark a vibrant revival of first-rate Franciscan scholarship, they also made their scholarship accessible for eager readers on the popular level.

For the past forty years, their progeny have worked long and hard and have further probed, developed, translated, and made available deeper riches of this ancient, yet fertile tradition. Indeed, they have gone further and deeper in exploring the relationship of past to present for import and future promise. While still in its initial stages, this exploring of the past in light of the contemporary has established a launching pad for what might well be described as a third generation of Franciscan studies. Nor is that study now limited solely to members of the religious institutes of the Franciscan family. Other scholars, Catholic, Protestant and, yes, Jewish, are now numbered among significant commentators on the Franciscan tradition.

Of the many remarkable directions set out in Vatican II, the call to religious institutes of women and men to return to the charism of their . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.