Servius' Commentary on Book Four of Virgil's Aeneid: An Annotated Translation

Servius' Commentary on Book Four of Virgil's Aeneid: An Annotated Translation

Servius' Commentary on Book Four of Virgil's Aeneid: An Annotated Translation

Servius' Commentary on Book Four of Virgil's Aeneid: An Annotated Translation

Synopsis

A unique tool for scholars and teachers, this translation and commentary, on facing pages with the original Latin, allows easy access to Servius' seminal work on one of the most widely-read books of the Aeneid: Book 4.-- Introduction on the life of Servius, the textual tradition-- Latin text of Vergil's Aeneid, Book 4, with Servius' commentary beneath it-- Facing-page translation of both Vergil and Servius-- Endnotes-- Bibliography-- Facsimile of the 1536 edition of Servius' commentary on Book 4

Excerpt

As Robert Kaster pointed out, Servius’ approach to Virgil does little to endear him to the modern reader. Yet acquaintance with Servius remains essential to students of Virgil and of the late-antique commentary tradi; tion. With this annotated translation of his commentary on Book Four of the Aeneid we hope to make Servius (not the thornier Servius auctus) accessible to more of these readers: first to those who, though they may have an interest in his Virgil commentary, have neither the Latin nor the patience to deal with Servius in the raw; second, to students of late; antique and medieval history, for whom Servius is an invaluable source. We have chosen to translate the commentary on the fourth book because it is so often taught and because the story of Dido and Aeneas has such resonance in later works of art, from Ovid to Berlioz.

In the course of this project we have incurred many debts of gratitude. Two scholars were especially generous with their advice and encourage; ment in the early stages of our work, and to them—Professor Raymond Starr of Wellesley College and the late Professor Peter Marshall of Amherst College—we owe special thanks. Professor James Halporn read the completed manuscript and gave valuable advice. Professor James Zetzel also helped shed light on several obscure passages. For their help in preparing the manuscript for publication our thanks to Kim Uyen Dang, Christopher Hydal and Kathleen Kienzle. Finally, to Dr. Ladislaus (Lou) J. Bolchazy and Laurie Haight Keenan of Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers our thanks for their patience and encouragement. We would also like to thank the American Philological Association for permission to reprint the text of Book Four from the “;Harvard Servius,”; as well as John Atteberry of the John J. Burns Library of Boston College, which kindly granted permission for the reproduction of the Niccolini Aeneid in its collection. We would especially like to thank the Costa and Mary Maliotis Charitable Foundation, which defrayed many of the expenses incurred in the course of our work.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.