Therapist into Coach

Therapist into Coach

Therapist into Coach

Therapist into Coach

Excerpt

The coaching world is expanding. A profession that was largely unknown a decade ago is now an attractive second career for increasing numbers of people looking for new ways of growing their interest in the development of people. Some observers estimate that the number of new coaches joining the market is doubling every year.

Yet while there are many books which cater for the beginner coach, including my own book, also published by Open University Press, Coaching Skills: A Handbook, there are relatively few which explore and deepen more specialist aspects of the role. That is the purpose of this series. It is called Coaching in Practice because the aim is to unite theory and practice in an accessible way. The books are short, designed to be easily understood, without in any way compromising the integrity of the ideas they explore. All are written by senior coaches with, in every case, many years of hands-on experience.

This series is for you if you are undertaking or completing your coaching training and perhaps in the early stages of the unpredictability, pleasures and dilemmas that working with actual clients brings. Now that you have passed the honeymoon stage, you may have begun to notice the limitations of your approaches and knowledge. You are eager for more information and guidance. You probably know that it is hard to make the leap between being a good-enough coach and an outstanding one. You are thirsty for more help and challenge. You may also be one of the many people still contemplating a career in coaching. If so, these books will give you useful direction on many of the issues which preoccupy, perplex and delight the working coach.

That is where I hope you will find the Coaching in Practice series so useful.

One of the hottest topics in coaching is, what is the difference between coaching and therapy? This book answers the question from an unusual angle because it is written by someone who is both a qualified, practising therapist and an experienced executive coach. For this reason it will be vital reading for any therapist considering making the transition into coaching. If you are such a therapist, it will reassure you that you already have many of the skills that you will need in order to thrive as a coach. At the same time it will clearly spell out where and how you need to change your attitudes, approaches and behaviours with many practical suggestions for building your skills. The book also has many tried and tested ideas for client-friendly activities to use in a coaching session. This book should also be required reading for coaches who . . .

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