The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas

The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas

The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas

The English Change Network: Forcing Changes into Schemas

Synopsis

This book introduces the notion of change construction and systematically studies, within a Cognitive Grammar framework, the rich inventory of its instantiations in English, from well-known structures such as the so-called resultative construction to a variety of largely ignored types such as asymmetric resultatives, sublexical change constructions and mildly causal constructions.

Excerpt

This chapter discusses the inadequacy of the “traditional” definition of resultative phrase (i.e. Levin 1993’s definition), see section 1, and argues for the need to introduce the notion of change phrase, see section 3. Further, it contends that so-called transitive resultative constructions (i.e. causative transitive change constructions) are cognitively grounded, being a variant of Langacker’s billiard-ball model, see section 2. This chapter also addresses the questions of temporal dependency (or homomorphism in the sense of Wechsler 2001) and causality between the two subevents making up resultative sentences. It shows that temporal dependency rests on the notion of visibility, see section 1.1, and causality (to be divided into superordinate and subordinate causality, see section 1.2) depends on the conceptual distance between the two subevents. Finally, it proposes that change phrases can be sublexically oriented, as with emission verbs (see section 3.2.1). It is argued that orientation for the change phrase depends on causality and animacy, see section 3.2.2.

1. Resultative phrases and constructions

The term resultative is usually employed in two senses, only one of which will be relevant to this work. On the one hand, it is used to refer “to those verb forms that express a state implying a previous event” (Nedjalkov 1988: 6). Hence, a sentence like John is sitting is categorised as a resultative construction because the verb form is sitting codes a state and implies the preceding event John sat down. On the other hand, linguists also regard the term “resultative” as referring to the notion of resultative phrase/construction as defined for example by Levin (1993). She terms resultative phrase (RP for short) . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.