Women, Violence, and Strategies for Action: Feminist Research, Policy, and Practice

Women, Violence, and Strategies for Action: Feminist Research, Policy, and Practice

Women, Violence, and Strategies for Action: Feminist Research, Policy, and Practice

Women, Violence, and Strategies for Action: Feminist Research, Policy, and Practice

Synopsis

This collection gives important insight into the new issues and questions that have become central to understandings of women, violence and resistance. It focuses on the connections between research and the development of strategies for change by providing excellent examples of policy-relevant feminist research, rooted in both academe and activism. The emphasis throughout is on the link between research and strategies for action at the local, national and international level.

Excerpt

Jill Radford, Lynne Harne and Melissa Friedberg

Women, Violence and Strategies for Action continues the project of presenting contemporary feminist research on men’s violence arising from discussions in the British Sociological Association Violence Against Women Study Group. Like earlier books in the series (Hanmer and Maynard 1987; Hanmer et al. 1989; Hester et al. 1996) it introduces some new directions in feminist work, the changing contexts in which it is occurring, and connections between research and activist intervention strategies in feminist struggles.

A central aim is to present recent research findings and theoretical developments in relation to a range of forms of sexual violence including: domestic violence (Malos; Williamson; Hester); sexual harassment (Kelly and Humphreys; Harne); rape and sexual assault (Skinner; Radford); prostitution (Swirsky and Jenkins; Friedberg); pornography (Gillespie; Swirsky and Jenkins); and child sexual abuse (Kelly and Humphreys; Harne; Bernard). Consequently, the book advances the knowledge base surrounding the problem of sexual violence. A number of chapters refer to the way feminist work has placed this issue on local, national and global policy agendas (Kelly and Humphreys; Gillespie; Harne; Malos; Hester; Radford).

Over the last 25 years the subject has been variously named as ‘violence against women’, ‘sexual violence’ or ‘gender violence’. The politics of naming and definition, an important theme in feminist theorizing, have been central to work in this field, shaping the development of research and knowledge creation. Feminist definitions, grounded in the experiences of women and children, have developed with the growth of feminist knowledge and understanding, as an outcome of research.

Earlier research named the problem as ‘violence against women’. While it signifies the gendered nature of the violence, a limitation of this early concept was its failure to specify any connection with the abuse of children, although the interconnectedness of woman and child abuse has been a longstanding . . .

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