Undressing Feminism: A Philosophical Expose

Undressing Feminism: A Philosophical Expose

Undressing Feminism: A Philosophical Expose

Undressing Feminism: A Philosophical Expose

Synopsis

Undressing Feminism is an eminently readable work in which Klein argues that today's feminism is one of the leading causes of social and legal problems in contemporary American culture. Undressing Feminism traces the fight for equality for women from the 1700s until today and then makes dire predictions for feminism's future. Klein weaves an historical accounting of some of the most outrageous and interesting claims of "equality" made throughout the centuries. Although entirely committed to the spirit of first generation feminists, Klein shows that contemporary feminism(s), once "disrobed" from its rhetorical garb of equality with men, is laid bare as having a single-minded political agenda - the achievement of privilege over men. This goal, it is argued, is blatantly inconsistent with any reasonable notion of equality, and creates an insidious sexism apparent in the behavior of feminists themselves. In the final analysis, Klein urges readers to abandon feminism, in all its contemporary guises, in order to embrace a productive and healthy account of justice, merit, and overall human excellence.

Excerpt

Undressing Feminism offers the reader an opportunity to view feminism’s history and philosophy through the eyes of an “outsider”—that is, someone who has not bought in to its political agenda. Although the text is not intended to be fundamentally polemical, my commitment to what I have called “first generation” feminism will be obvious. As such, the content of this text will be unique for the genre.

The form of this text will also be unique. For I do not simply present the development of feminism chronologically, but rather chronicle the most fundamental kinds and stages of feminism through an analysis of the philosophical notion of equality and its operational and legalistic notion of equity. The latter notion is assumed simply to mean impartial justice or fairness under the law. With respect to this text, the law will be taken to mean the federal and state laws of the United States of America.

The issue of equality is not so easily defined. Hence, it is the object of this text both to discover and analyze just what is meant by equality at different stages in the lifetime of feminism. Whether one views such changes over the last century or so of feminism’s history as important or trivial, just or unjust, harmful or helpful will be left to the reader.

At times, especially in the book’s sixth and seventh chapters, my discussion of feminism requires the use of coarse terminology. I intend no offense to any reader when this is the case, but, from time to time, scholarly accuracy necessitates the use of provocative words. Without these words, the aspects of feminism under discussion can neither be identified nor described properly.

I would like to acknowledge my eternal indebtedness to my former professor and friend, Dr. James Fetzer, for believing in me through the years. Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to do this project.

A special “thank you” is extended to Ms. Peggy Dyess, from the Flagler College Library for all of her expert assistance and . . .

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