Eating the Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete against Brand Leaders

Eating the Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete against Brand Leaders

Eating the Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete against Brand Leaders

Eating the Big Fish: How Challenger Brands Can Compete against Brand Leaders

Synopsis

EATING THE BIG FISH : How Challenger Brands Can Compete Against Brand Leaders, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded

The second edition of the international bestseller, now revised and updated for 2009, just in time for the business challenges ahead.

It contains over 25 new interviews and case histories, two completely new chapters, introduces a new typology of 12 different kinds of Challengers, has extensive updates of the main chapters, a range of new exercises, supplies weblinks to view interviews online and offers supplementary downloadable information.

Excerpt

Everybody pulls for David, nobody roots for Goliath

—Wilt Chamberlain

In the beginning was Avis. the little fish, aiming to reverse the food chain.

And Avis begat the Pepsi Challenge.

And the Pepsi Challenge begat Apple 1984.

And they all had a love child together called Richard Branson. Who was then knighted by Her Majesty the Queen for services to the Underdog.

And that was the way we thought Challengers went, really. All doing the same sort of thing, all very successfully. All plucky underdogs, all asking us to take a position. All creating the impression that this hugely crowded category was in reality simply a matter of a two-horse race and asking us whose side we were going to take: Were we with the little guy or the big guy here?

And from then on, every decade there seemed to be one new iconic battle between Challenger and leader. and those iconic battles always seemed to take essentially the same form: Small Challenger makes public challenge to Market Leader, in open pursuit of column inches, news footage, sympathy, and sales. a charmingly scrappy David against a visible and, now we realize, strangely sinister Goliath. There was nothing wrong in any of these Challengers and everything right about this stance, of course—but it was always at its heart exactly the same stance. David versus Goliath.

Yet the past 15 years have seen a remarkable new diversity and flowering of Challenger thinking around us, in three important and distinct . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.