Edison in the Boardroom Revisited: How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Property

Edison in the Boardroom Revisited: How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Property

Edison in the Boardroom Revisited: How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Property

Edison in the Boardroom Revisited: How Leading Companies Realize Value from Their Intellectual Property

Synopsis

A revised and expanded edition of the groundbreaking Edison in the Boardroom, highlighting the winning strategies today's biggest companies use to maximize the value of their intellectual property

Now fully revised and expanded, Edison in the Boardroom, Second Edition takes an in-depth look at the revolutionary concept of intellectual asset management (IAM). Incorporating stories and teachings from some of the most successful companies in the world--such as Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Procter & Gamble, Rockwell, Dow, Ford and many others--Harrison and Sullivan have made an exhaustive study of IAM and its implications for today's businesses.

  • Features updated interviews of companies, and a new treatment of the Profit Center Level
  • Updates stories and teachings from some of the most successful companies in the world
  • Showcases a hierarchy of best practices that today's companies can integrate into their own business philosophies to gain the best return from their intellectual assets

Edison in the Boardroom, Second Edition compiles a wealth of knowledge and successful stories that illustrate how far businesses have come in their ability to leverage and monetize their intellectual assets.

Excerpt

The lightbulb and its inventor, Thomas Alva Edison, have become synonymous with invention. When we think of a bright idea, we envision a lightbulb. When we think of prolific inventors, Edison usually tops the list. But the true legacy of Edison did not stop with invention; it expanded to include innovation—the subject of this book.

Invention is merely the conception of an idea—the start of a process that will eventually produce value. Innovation, by contrast, is the life of an idea. It begins with “invention” and ends with value that can be captured and demonstrated in financial statements and, yes, in the cash box. An invention becomes an innovation when it is successfully introduced into the marketplace. And this is true whether the “product” emerges as tangible goods or an intangible service.

It is innovation, not invention, that generates corporate profits and competitive advantage. Far too many companies focus solely on invention at the expense of devoting resources and attention to the full process of innovation.

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