Handbook of Motivational Counseling: Goal-Based Approaches to Assessment and Intervention with Addiction and Other Problems

Handbook of Motivational Counseling: Goal-Based Approaches to Assessment and Intervention with Addiction and Other Problems

Handbook of Motivational Counseling: Goal-Based Approaches to Assessment and Intervention with Addiction and Other Problems

Handbook of Motivational Counseling: Goal-Based Approaches to Assessment and Intervention with Addiction and Other Problems

Synopsis

Revised and updated to reflect the most recent developments in the field, the second edition of the Handbook of Motivational Counseling presents comprehensive coverage of the development and identification of motivational problems and the most effective treatment techniques.
  • Equips clinicians with specific instructions for enhancing clients' motivation for change by targeting their maladaptive motivational patterns
  • Provides step-by-step instructions in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the motivational assessments, along with details of how to implement the counseling procedures
  • Updated to reflect the most current research and effective treatment techniques, along with all-new chapters on motive-based approaches, motivational counseling with the dually diagnosed, cognitive and motivational retraining, meaning-centered counseling, and motivation in sport
  • Showcases various basic motivational techniques and their adaptations, such as bibliotherapy, individual therapy, and group counseling, while demonstrating specialized uses of the techniques, such as in work settings and rehabilitation medicine

Excerpt

Humans are goal strivers. Human life is an overlapping succession of goal pursuits pursuits of goals ranging from getting tomorrow’s breakfast to finding a partner, concluding a business deal, or finding spiritual enlightenment. Without these pursuits, human life feels empty. People whose needs appear to be fulfilled without much effort on their part seek additional goals to pursue. In some cases, they seek substances or thrills to allay their boredom and emptiness.

The processes that make these goal pursuits possible and that ultimately determine an individual’s life’s meaning are what we mean by the term motivation. Because it is so basic to human existence, motivation is an important topic for everyone who works in the helping professions. It is hard to be helpful to people in need without knowing what they are after. Many lack the motivation – the goals and effective ways of pursuing them – to achieve the things that they want and need in life. Motivational deficits can prevent people from seizing opportunities that would enable them to lead fulfilling lives. The deficits can interfere with people’s work productivity and their satisfaction with life. They can cause people to seek alternative but self-defeating ways to obtain satisfaction, such as by using alcohol or by other forms of drug abuse. In still other cases, these deficits can result in psychological maladjustment and distress. This book discusses the ways in which motivational problems develop, how they can be identified, and how they can be corrected.

Our work on motivational counseling started more than 30 years ago at the University of Minnesota, Morris, where we were faculty members. We both were interested in motivation from a theoretical perspective and in alcohol abuse, and were particularly interested in identifying the variables controlling people’s motivation to drink excessively. Thus began our long-standing collaboration.

As we embarked on the research, we were struck by the high incidence of relapse into abusive drinking by drinkers who had sought help for their problem drinking and whose problem had temporarily remitted. The return to problematic drinking shortly after treatment appeared to result from an eroding motivation not to drink rather than from any deterioration of the skills that patients had learned during treatment for coping with their drinking. For this reason, promising therapies, whether behavioral or pharmaceutical, have regularly failed with the great majority of substance-abusing clients. Recovering drinkers, upon experiencing an abstinent or moderate-drinking lifestyle that was no more satisfying than the problem-drinking lifestyle had been, seemed to reach a point where they decided to resume drinking in an attempt to make their lives more bearable.

We therefore sought to find new techniques to improve problem drinkers’ motivation to recover. We found important clues as to what our focus should be from several sources of evidence regarding differences between the majority of alcohol abusers who had relapsed . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.