Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone Contexts

Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone Contexts

Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone Contexts

Intimate Enemies: Translation in Francophone Contexts

Synopsis

The concept of translation has become central to postcolonial theory in recent decades. This volume draws together reflections by translators, authors and academics working across Africa, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean - areas where the linguistic legacies of French colonial operations are long-lasting and complex.

Excerpt

The title of this volume, ‘Intimate Enemies’, was originally proposed by Maryse Condé and Richard Philcox as the title for their conversation, which appears in the second section. A husband-wife translator-author duo, Condé and Philcox are perhaps better placed than many to reflect on the intimacies and conflicts that characterize the translation process. Yet their conversation reveals two rather surprising things: firstly, that there is never confrontation between Condé and her translator, and, secondly, that there is no collaboration either, as one might expect given her personal connection to Philcox. Instead, Condé and Philcox’s conversation reveals two types of intimacy: firstly, between the author and her text, which Condé describes as being ‘closer than the ties between a mother and her children’. Secondly, between the translator and the original text: Philcox speaks of the translation process as a search not for the apposite word or expression but for the text’s voice, music or spirit. The intimacy which characterizes the relationship between author and translator, then, is not a direct but an indirect one, taking place through the text itself. In this respect, Condé’s and Philcox’s comments offer an interesting echo of Jacques Poulin’s novel, La Traduction est une histoire d’amour [Translation is a Love Affair], in which the narrator, herself a translator, cautions: ‘n’allez pas croire qu’il nous suffit de trouver les mots et les phrases qui correspondent le mieux au texte de depart. Il faut aller . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.