The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 7

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 7

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 7

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 7

Synopsis


This volume has become known as perhaps the best introduction to Jung's work. In these famous essays. "The Relations between the Ego and the Unconscious" and "On the Psychology of the Unconscious," he presented the essential core of his system. Historically, they mark the end of Jung's intimate association with Freud and sum up his attempt to integrate the psychological schools of Freud and Adler into a comprehensive framework.


This is the first paperback publication of this key work in its revised and augmented second edition of 1966. The earliest versions of the Two Essays, "New Paths in Psychology" (1912) and "The Structure of the Unconscious" (1916), discovered among Jung's posthumous papers, are published in an appendix, to show the development of Jung's thought in later versions. As an aid to study, the index has been comprehensively expanded.

Excerpt

16 In the light of this discovery, the question of the trauma was answered in a most unexpected manner; but in its place the investigator was faced with the problem of the erotic conflict, which, as our example shows, contains a wealth of abnormal elements and cannot at first sight be compared with an ordinary erotic conflict. What is peculiarly striking and almost incredible is that only the pretence should be conscious, while the patient’s real passion remained hidden from her. In this case certainly, it is beyond dispute that the real relationship was shrouded in darkness, while the pretended one dominated the field of consciousness. If we formulate these facts theoretically, we arrive at the following result: there are in a neurosis two tendencies standing in strict opposition to one another, one of which is unconscious. This proposition is formulated in very general terms on purpose, because I want to stress that although the pathogenic conflict is a personal matter it is also a broadly human conflict manifesting itself in the individual, for disunity with oneself is the hall-mark of civilized man. The neurotic is only a special instance of the disunited man who ought to harmonize nature and culture within himself.

17 The growth of culture consists, as we know, in a progressive subjugation of the animal in man. It is a process of domestication which cannot be accomplished without rebellion on the part of the animal nature that thirsts for freedom. From time to time there passes as it were a wave of frenzy through the ranks of men too long constrained within the limitations of their culture. Antiquity experienced it in the Dionysian orgies that surged over from the East and became an essential and characteristic ingredient of classical culture. The spirit of these orgies contributed not a little towards the development of the stoic ideal of asceticism in the innumerable sects and philosophical schools . . .

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