The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 16

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 16

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 16

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung - Vol. 16

Synopsis


Essays on aspects of analytical therapy, specifically the transference, abreaction, and dream analysis. Contains an additional essay, "The Realities of Practical Psychotherapy," found among Jung's posthumous papers.

Excerpt

This volume, number 16 in the series, is the first of the Gesammelte Werke to be published. It contains both early and late writings on questions concerned with the practice of psychotherapy. I am indebted to the Editors not only for their careful revision of the texts, but in particular for their choice of material. This testifies to their appreciation of the fact that my contribution to the knowledge of the psyche is founded on practical experience of human beings. It was, indeed, my endeavours as a medical psychologist to understand the ills of the soul that led me, in more than fifty years of psychotherapeutic practice, to all my later insights and conclusions, and in turn compelled me to re-examine my findings and to modify them in the light of new experience.

The reader will find in these essays not only an outline of my attitude as a practising psychotherapist and of the principles on which it rests. They also contain an historical study of a phenomenon that may be regarded as the crux, or at any rate the crucial experience, in any thorough-going analysis—the problem of the transference, whose central importance was recognized long ago by Freud. This question is of such scope, and so difficult to elucidate in all its aspects, that a deeper investigation of its historical antecedents could not be avoided.

Naturally, if an historical study like this is seen in isolation from my later writings, the unprepared reader will have some difficulty in recognizing its connection with his conception of what psychotherapy should be. Psychotherapeutic practice and the historical approach will seem to him to be two incommensurable things. in psychological reality, however, this is not the case at all, for we are constantly coming upon phenomena that reveal their historical character as soon as their causality is examined a little more closely. Psychic modes of behaviour are . . .

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