Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety

Anxiety

Synopsis

Collectively, anxiety disorders constitute the world's most common mental health problem. Written accounts of attempts to classify, diagnose, and treat these disorders date as far back as the Classical Greek period, and evidence of attempts to chemically and surgically manage anxiety and fear go back even farther, suggesting these disorders have challenged us throughout human history.

Excerpt

Most people can relate to anxiety disorders more easily than to any other mental health disorder. We all experience anxiety and stress; these feelings are a natural part of our functioning. Each of us exists somewhere on a spectrum of anxiety vulnerability, which ranges from a zone of appropriate response to true anxiety-provoking events to a psychobiological medical disorder known as an anxiety disorder.

As a psychologist, I encounter the full spectrum of these responses in my clinical practice. People enter therapy to deal with life stresses, anxiety reactions to life events, and full-blown, diagnosable anxiety disorders. I see people who suffer from a mixture of depression and anxiety and people who have an anxiety disorder in addition to another major mental illness. I see anxiety disorders, more often than any other disorder, present in my own family, friends, and acquaintances. Anxiety disorders are prevalent throughout the world’s population (an estimated 29 percent of all adults in the United States have had an anxiety disorder in their lifetime), and we speak of “life’s anxieties,” “cultural anxiety,” and “times of anxiety” in our day-to-day life. Anxiety is an interesting topic indeed.

This book begins by looking at the phenomenon of anxiety both as a normal part of life and as a medical disorder, because the two experiences of . . .

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