Asian American Chronology

Asian American Chronology

Asian American Chronology

Asian American Chronology

Excerpt

Four decades ago, as part of the Third World student movement, Asian American students at San Francisco State University and the University of California at Berkeley launched a pan-Asian movement, which gave birth to the field of Asian American studies. Since then ethnically diverse curricula gradually developed in colleges and universities throughout the country, generating much academic interest in the experiences of Asians in the United States. The Asian population in the United States reached 12.5 million, or 4.5 percent of the total U.S. population, at the turn of the twenty-first century, up from 7.3 million and 3 percent of the U.S. population a decade earlier, but academic endeavors in the field have yet to meet the demand outside colleges and universities. It is common for Asian Americans to be viewed as Asians instead of Americans, and Asian American history is often considered as part of Asian history instead of American history. The growth of Asian American population and visibility necessitate a concise, reliable, and updated history of Asian Americans.

Asian American Chronology is designed to reach a broad audience. It provides both academic and nonacademic readers with a succinct history of a diverse American ethnic group. Significant events, activities, and individuals, from the prehistorical era to the present time, are categorized into specific themes and arranged chronologically by year or time period. Readers who are interested in a particular topic can trace changes over time by following the correlating subject entries throughout the book; those who are interested in certain historical events such as World War II or the Vietnam War, for example, can go directly to the relevant periods to find out what happened to Asian Americans in those times of rapid social change. The 31 subject categories are: agriculture and farming; architecture; art and performing arts; Asia and U.S. relations with Asia; civil rights and protests; community activities; crime; economics and employment; education and schools; family and gender; food and drink; health and disease; languages; laws and court cases; media and films; migration and immigration; military services; music and dance; obituary; politics and political activism; population; publications; race relations; religion and spirituality; science and scientists; settlement patterns; social organization; sports and recreation; trade; treaties; and wars, conquests, and exploration. These subject category entries will help readers learn about historical events and progress in the Asian American communities.

The transliteration of personal names in this book is sometimes inconsistent for a number of reasons. In most Asian societies, the family name precedes an individual’s given name. Asians living in the United States often invert their family and given names following American and European practice, but some have chosen not to do so. For example . . .

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