Autism

Autism

Autism

Autism

Synopsis

Sportscaster 'Plain Jane' Alexander was a late bloomer. Back in the day, she blended into the background, content to watch from the sidelines while Grayson Pierce soaked up the spotlight. Content until he broke her heart. Bitter, hurt and angry Jane did the college thing, came out of her shell, and never looked back. Grayson loves baseball. It was his pastime in high school, his passion in college, and now... his career. However baseball isn't the only thing in Grayson's heart. The problem is that Grayson has the reputation as a bad-boy. He likes fast cars and loose women and expensive liquor. All things that make him deplorable in Jane's eyes, throw in his hot and cold attitude and she is ready to scream. When the promise of an exclusive interview brings a very reluctant Jane to Grayson's home, she realizes that not everything is as it appears."Author Morgan Kearns does it again... IN IT TO WIN IT will fast become a 'keeper book' for any romance reader." -Kari Thomas, author of Spell-Kissed

Excerpt

QUESTION: WHAT DO THESE SIX INDIVIDUALS HAVE IN
COMMON?

Donald T.’s Story: Odd Language

Donald T. wasn’t like other children his age. While most one year olds were struggling to come up with a few simple words such as “hi,” “bye-bye,” “doggie,” “kitty,” “mama,” and “dada,” Donald could already sing several different songs with surprising accuracy. By the time he was two, he was able to recite short poems and learn the Twenty-third Psalm by heart. He quickly memorized the entire alphabet backward and forward and could count to one hundred with ease (tasks most kindergarteners, and even most adults, cannot accomplish). He developed the seemingly impossible ability to spin unlikely objects: blocks, pans, or any round object he came across would balance and twirl improbably at his touch. Watching the object whirl, Don jumped up and down in ecstasy. His speech was odd, consisting primarily of words that bore no obvious connection to his activity or environment: “chrysanthemum”; “business”; “the right one is on, the left one is off”; “Through the dark clouds shining.” He showed no interest in playing with other children and seemed oblivious to the comings and goings of most . . .

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