Music in the Middle Ages: A Reference Guide

Music in the Middle Ages: A Reference Guide

Music in the Middle Ages: A Reference Guide

Music in the Middle Ages: A Reference Guide

Synopsis

In the wake of the settlement of the Oslo Accords in 1993, billions were pledged and disbursed by international donors in support of the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. As a result, the international community had a large stake in the maintenance of the fragile attempts at peace in the Middle East. In Building a State under Occupation, Husam Zomlot assesses the reasons why, despite this outpouring of international aid into the situation, the Oslo Accords ultimately failed. By focusing on donors and the political economy of peacebuilding and reconstruction, Zomlot highlights the assumptions which inform policy-making when attempting to mediate conflict. He therefore suggests that, in addition to a lack of appropriate political will, the international community gravely misread the political realities in both sides, particularly Israel's intentions with regards to the final outcome. This exploration of the realities of peacebuilding aid will therefore be of interest not only to researchers of Development Studies, Conflict Resolution, and Political Economy, but also to policymakers and practitioners in the field.

Excerpt

This book is intended for the general reader who is curious about music and its development between the years 1000–1450 A.D., and the world in which it was written and performed. It is not intended to be a scholarly tome. Although there were, as in any era, many solutions to questions of notation and performance, this book will deal with the most prevalent of the time. And as a final caution, this book will not be dealing with two systems that were actually the more sophisticated musics of the time: those of Byzantium and Islam.

It is difficult to deal with an area the size of Europe over a span of 450 years. To help the reader, this book first presents a general background of the main events affecting the continent and the effects that they had on music in general. A chapter follows describing the foremost institution within which European music theory and practice were developed—the Church—and the role of music within it. The subsequent chapters delve more deeply into the development of music in various areas of Europe. Because of this format, there is a certain need to move back and forth in time. If a reference is made to something already mentioned, the readers will be referred to the relevant chapter to refresh their memory.

Also, to help the reader, areas of Europe are loosely referred to by their presentday names. However, one must remember that words such as “France,” “Italy,” “Germany,” and even “England” are really misnomers in a medieval context. This is because what the reader now knows as a continent divided neatly into unified countries was, in the Middle Ages, a patchwork of city-states, principalities, fiefdoms . . .

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