American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Mental Health: Development, Context, Prevention, and Treatment

American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Mental Health: Development, Context, Prevention, and Treatment

American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Mental Health: Development, Context, Prevention, and Treatment

American Indian and Alaska Native Children and Mental Health: Development, Context, Prevention, and Treatment

Synopsis

This unique book examines the physical, psychological, social, and environmental factors that support or undermine healthy development in American Indian children, including economics, biology, and public policies.

Excerpt

The twentieth century closed with a decade devoted to the study of brain structure, function, and development that in parallel with studies of the human genome has revealed the extraordinary plasticity of biobehavioral organization and development. The twenty-first century opened with a decade focusing on behavior, but the linkages between brain and behavior are as dynamic as the linkages between parents and children, and children and environment.

The Child Psychology and Mental Health series is designed to capture much of this dynamic interplay by advocating for strengthening the science of child development and linking that science to issues related to mental health, child care, parenting, and public policy.

The series consists of individual monographs or thematic volumes, each dealing with a subject that advances knowledge related to the interplay between normal developmental process and developmental psychopathology. The books are intended to reflect the diverse methodologies and content areas encompassed by an age period ranging from conception to late adolescence. Topics of contemporary interest include studies of socioemotional development, behavioral undercontrol, aggression, attachment disorders, substance abuse, and the role that culture and other contextual influences play in creating developmental trajectories. Investigators involved with prospective longitudinal studies, large epidemiologic crosssectional samples, intensely followed clinical cases, or those wishing to report a systematic sequence of connected experiments are invited to . . .

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