Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture

Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture

Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture

Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture

Synopsis

"Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture" explores the ongoing digital revolution and examines the way it is changing--and will change--the way people live and communicate. Starting from the proposition that the Internet is now the center of popular culture, the book offers descriptions of blogs and Twitter and the online behavior they foster. It looks at the demographics of users and the impact of the Internet on knowledge, thinking, writing, politics, and journalism.

A primary focus is on the way blogs and tweets are opening up communication to the people, free from gatekeepers and sanctioned rhetoric. The other side of the coin is the online hijacking of the news and its potential for spreading misinformation and fomenting polarization, topics that are analyzed even as the situation continues to evolve. Finally, the book gathers predictions from cultural critics about the future of digital popular culture and makes a few predictions of its own.

Excerpt

“Everything’s changing!” a startled Today show news anchor blurted out, blinking into the camera as she finished reading the morning’s headlines.

It’s true. Nothing’s going to be the same.

A tsunami of electronic media has overtaken us on the Internet, transforming everything in its path. It’s a revolution, and no one quite knows where we are headed.

Way back in the 20th century, media guru Marshall McLuhan predicted that electronic technology was going to change the world, turning it into a village and sending people back to their tribes.

Hello.

It’s already happened.

In the 21st century of the blog, Twitter, and social media networks, we are already living in a global village online, sorting ourselves out into tribes of opinion, lifestyle, and ideology. If how people communicate determines how they think, live, and behave, as McLuhan said, we are well on our way to cataclysmic changes in those ways of thinking, living, and behaving. It feels as if the whole world is on the cusp of monumental change, at “an uncharted frontier,” as New York Times columnist Frank Rich characterized it. Maybe that www web address stands for the wild, wild web.

Blogs, Twitter, and social media networks on the World Wide Web have opened up the conversation and leveled the playing field for ordinary people to express themselves without the usual gatekeepers. Bloggers of every description and ideological stripe put out news bulletins and op-eds on a relentless hourly basis, covering everything from current events and . . .

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