Border Crossings and Beyond: The Life and Works of Sandra Cisneros

Border Crossings and Beyond: The Life and Works of Sandra Cisneros

Border Crossings and Beyond: The Life and Works of Sandra Cisneros

Border Crossings and Beyond: The Life and Works of Sandra Cisneros

Synopsis

This authoritative guide helps Baby Boomers navigate their way through a host of issues that typically affect careers from the midpoint onward toward retirement.

Excerpt

The Women Writers of Color biography series was created to celebrate the lives and letters of women writers of African American, Asian American, Native American, and U.S. Latina descent; it is designed to inform and to delight a multicultural audience that knows both the cost and the necessity of creativity. This series exists for every woman writer of color whose work we will never know; it exists for everyone of every race who can read or hear these words and appreciate them; it exists for every little girl of any race whoever wrote a poem and hid it; and it exists for daughters of those mothers whose creativity and intelligence were suppressed, hidden, targeted, or denied. It opens the way for literary works that have been overlooked for too long to find their well-deserved places in our libraries and on our bookshelves. Each biographical volume is published with a user friendly bibliography so that readers can pursue original readings by these authors and find existing literary criticism more readily.

We are proud to present Border Crossings and Beyond: The Life and Works of Sandra Cisneros by Carmen Haydée Rivera, the first biography in the Women Writers of Color series to explore the formidable body of literature blooming as a defiant testament of creativity and transcendence among Latina writers living and working at the borderlands of geography and consciousness. Sandra Cisneros, born in Chicago of a Mexican father and a Mexican American mother, represents the Tex-Mex border as a “site of memory” that extends into the heart of North America. La Frontera simultaneously unites and divides generations of Mexicans and Mexican Americans who share ancient bloodlines, rich linguistic traditions, and sacred mythology, including the remembrance of an ancestral homeland, sometimes referred to as Aztlán. Cisneros’ work, like that of many of her sisters, grapples with a profound sense of dislocation and displacement with subtlety, dignity, grace, and sass; her words rise . . .

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