Celeb 2.0: How Social Media Foster Our Fascination with Popular Culture

Celeb 2.0: How Social Media Foster Our Fascination with Popular Culture

Celeb 2.0: How Social Media Foster Our Fascination with Popular Culture

Celeb 2.0: How Social Media Foster Our Fascination with Popular Culture

Synopsis

With Ashton Kutcher's record-breaking "tweeting" more famous than his films, and Perez Hilton actually getting more attention than Paris, the actress often covered in his blog, the worlds of celebrity celebration and online social networking are pushing the public's crush on the famous and infamous into overdrive. Celeb 2.0: How Social Media Foster Our Fascination with Popular Culture explores this phenomenon.Celeb 2.0 looks at how blogs, video sharing sites, user-news sites, social networks, and message boards are fueling America's already voracious consumption of pop culture. Full of fascinating insights and interviews, the book looks at how celebrities use blogs, Twitter, and other tools, how YouTube and other sites create celebrity, how Web 2.0 shortens the distance between fans and stars, and how the new social media influences news reporting and series television.

Excerpt

“The new Web is a very different thing. It’s a tool for bringing together the
small contributions of millions of people and making them matter. Silicon
Valley consultants call it Web 2.0, as if it were a new version of some old
software. But it’s really a revolution.”

—Lev Grossman, Time, 2006

The impact of social media has been observed in the domains of business, politics, religion, social movements, and interpersonal relationships. The most significant consequence of social media, however, may be the influence on popular culture, as social media affect our consumption patterns and our creation of popular culture products, possibly changing the very meaning of popular culture. This book provides an overview of key social media applications, namely blogs, video-sharing sites, social networks, message boards, and social news sites, and describes the synergistic relationship between these applications and popular culture.

The use of social media has grown from a fringe activity to a mainstream passion. Forrester Research’s 2008 Social Technographic Profile found that about 75% of U.S. adults use social media to connect and share with others, an increase from 56% for the same time period in 2007. Although a vibrant part of youth culture, social media are also used extensively by middle-aged adults. The Forrester study documented that the largest gains in adoption were among 35–44-year-olds. Even seniors are part of the trend. A study by AARP and the Center for the Digital Future at the USC Annenberg School of Communications found that 70% of AARP members surveyed (age 50 and up) consider the AARP online community to be “very” or “extremely” important to them, and 58% reported visiting the online community daily or several times a day. Data from RapLeaf shows an increased presence of older adults on social networking sites, but that the sites are still dominated by youth.

The remarkable growth of social media has amplified the public’s appetite for popular culture products. We are watching video clips on YouTube of our favorite television moments, reading blogs for the latest celebrity news, and listening to . . .

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