Child Abduction: Prevention, Investigation, and Recovery

Child Abduction: Prevention, Investigation, and Recovery

Child Abduction: Prevention, Investigation, and Recovery

Child Abduction: Prevention, Investigation, and Recovery

Synopsis

While most people have heard about high-profile abductions such as the Elizabeth Smart case, such abductions are not isolated cases. The abduction of children occurs much more often in our country than most people would suspect, but because of a fault in our country's national crime reporting procedures, no one knows the true number. This book details the scope of the child abduction problem in the United States, and its very real danger. It covers the different types of abductions and discusses the psychological changes that can occur in long-term abducted children that will often stop them from attempting to escape, or even to seek help, though good opportunities may present themselves. Snow also discusses the danger to secondary victims of child abduction. He devotes several chapters to what both parents and the government can do to stop many of the child abductions that now occur, and, for those not stopped, steps parents can take that will greatly assist the authorities in quickly locating and safely rescuing an abducted child. He concludes with a chapter on the psychological and emotional concerns of recovered abducted children, and how families can help them re-integrate themselves into a normal life. Real life examples are provided in every chapter.

Excerpt

It was every parent’s worst nightmare. Steve Groene’s eight-year-old daughter Shasta, nine-year-old son Dylan, and 13-year-old son Slade lived with his ex-wife Brenda and her boyfriend Mark McKenzie. Early in the morning of May 16, 2005, someone broke into his ex-wife’s house in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and killed her, Mark, and Slade. The intruder, police detectives later told the father, then likely abducted Shasta and Dylan. For Steve Groene, it was unbelievable. Things like that just didn’t happen in Coeur d’Alene. People living around there felt so safe they didn’t have deadbolts, and often didn’t even use the regular locks.

The detectives assigned to the case, even though believing the children had been abducted, had no idea where the murderer had taken them, or even if the children were still alive. Abductors of children often kill their victims within hours of the abduction. Hundreds of searchers, some on foot, some on horses, and others driving all-terrain vehicles, combed the heavy woods around the crime scene, looking for the missing children. In the hope of increasing their chances of success, the police also brought in a helicopter and even cadaver-sniffing dogs.

“We’re looking for anything right now, whether it be the children, the children’s bodies or evidence—a scrap of clothing, anything like that,” said Kootenia County Sheriff’s Captain Ben Wolfinger.

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