Cruising for Trouble: Cruise Ships as Soft Targets for Pirates, Terrorists, and Common Criminals

Cruising for Trouble: Cruise Ships as Soft Targets for Pirates, Terrorists, and Common Criminals

Cruising for Trouble: Cruise Ships as Soft Targets for Pirates, Terrorists, and Common Criminals

Cruising for Trouble: Cruise Ships as Soft Targets for Pirates, Terrorists, and Common Criminals

Synopsis

At the end of 2009, Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines launched Oasis of the Seas the largest passenger ship ever built, dwarfing the largest aircraft carrier. Putting "that many eggs (8,457 passengers and crew) in one basket (with 16 decks)" poses a colossal security concern.

Excerpt

Around January 1, 2006, four victims of crimes on cruise ships, among them this writer, got together to form International Cruise Victims Association (ICV). Within the relatively short time that this group has been in existence, many other victims and friends from around the world have joined our efforts. The organization has grown to several hundred members and friends located in 16 countries. ICV is a group that comprises victims who survived and family members of victims who did not survive crimes on cruise ships.

Our purpose from the start was to initiate efforts to reform the cruise line industry and to force it to better protect passengers and crew members in the future. Each board member who volunteers his or her time brings a unique skill and background to ICV. More than a year ago, the author of this book and I began to discuss the threat of piracy and terrorism against cruise ships. The author brought to ICV a unique talent, since he had served as head of security for two major cruise lines. During his tenure as head of security, he gained firsthand experience with the crucial issues that needed to be addressed, especially since one of his ships was actually attacked by a band of pirates.

When we formed ICV and started this journey, we could never have anticipated the path that we would take to achieve these goals. We were up against an industry that spent approximately $6 million just in 2008 on lobbying, with the goal of avoiding any type of regulations that would protect not only the passengers and crew members but also the ships themselves from acts of terrorism. What have we learned in our journey over the past three years? Some of the important items include these: cruise ships do not have legal responsibility for investigating crimes that may occur during a cruise. Cruise ships do not have legal responsibility for medical care provided to passengers during any cruise. Cruise ships do not have . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.