Dealing with Anxiety and Related Disorders: Understanding, Coping, and Prevention

Dealing with Anxiety and Related Disorders: Understanding, Coping, and Prevention

Dealing with Anxiety and Related Disorders: Understanding, Coping, and Prevention

Dealing with Anxiety and Related Disorders: Understanding, Coping, and Prevention

Synopsis

Despite the increasing success of conventional medical treatment and the continued development and improvement of mechanical revascularization approaches, a significant number of patients continue to have severe angina. This volume is intended to present a clear and concise up-to-date understanding of the pathophysiology and management concepts of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD). This book reflects the key issues relevant to practising cardiologists and internists in their care of patients with SIHD and summarizes the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of SIHD in an easy to read format. In particular, it provides a scientific evidence-based management approach to patients with suspected and diagnosed SIHD in clinical settings.

Excerpt

I don’t have big anxieties. I wish I did. I would be much more interesting.

—Roy Lichtenstein; American painter, 1923–1997

We live in an age of anxiety is a common phrase for many people that points to a daily life fraught with varying levels of anxiety, stress, trauma, or apprehension. Others may be unaware of the extent to which positive and negative stress can affect our health and daily decisions. In either case, it is not uncommon for people to deny, ignore, distort, or misunderstand symptoms of anxiety, which is only one of the reasons why anxiety and stress-related conditions are frequently untreated.

People who are dealing with worries and difficulties in their lives seldom find lasting comfort from others and may even be offended by comments offered from well-intentioned family members and friends. How often have you been troubled by something only to have someone say to you, “Well, you think that is bad, look at Charlie—his life is falling apart! Your life isn’t so bad.” Perhaps this was meant to be a source of comfort, but, personally, I have never found comparing someone else’s misery to mine an effective way to cheer me up. If it was as easy as, “Just don’t think about it!” or “Look on the bright side!” or even, “Don’t worry, things will eventually get better!” very few of us would ever experience feelings of anxiety.

Life is filled with people experiencing normal anxieties and stressors, but many live with a higher and prolonged level of anxiety identified as a type of a diagnosable illness called an Anxiety Disorder. This book examines the world of anxiety, including the definition and explanation of its effects, the important differences between normal anxiety and true clinical disorders . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.