Dope: A History of Performance Enhancement in Sports from the Nineteenth Century to Today

Dope: A History of Performance Enhancement in Sports from the Nineteenth Century to Today

Dope: A History of Performance Enhancement in Sports from the Nineteenth Century to Today

Dope: A History of Performance Enhancement in Sports from the Nineteenth Century to Today

Synopsis

Too many change efforts have self-destructed. Sure, there are many books about the theory of change and leading change, but we wanted to write a pragmatic, clear, concise book that you could use to actually achieve change."Holistic Change: Delivering Corporate Change That Lasts" is a practical, how-to book that gives you the information about change agents and the skills they'll need to be effective; how to overcome resistance to change; and an end-to-end methodology with decision points to determine if your team is prepared to deliver a corporate change that will truly last.The Holistic Change(SM) approach was developed over our combined 40 years of experience delivering successful corporate change. All aspects of the methodology have been tested at numerous Fortune 500 companies and vetted by conducting lessons learned and continuously improving the process.We developed the Holistic Change(SM) approach by learning from the unsuccessful aspects of change that we observed along the way. We fashioned a new approach that we have used to successfully drive changes and exceed expectations: delivering sustainable change in shorter periods of time and with greater-than-expected results.

Excerpt

In the last decade, Marion Jones, Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire, Lance Armstrong, and a host of other high-profile athletes have—in one way or another—been connected to allegations of doping. With the current torrent of stories about doping in sports, one could hardly be blamed for thinking that the problem is of epidemic proportions and that the epidemic is of recent origins. Given that many of the lower-level and mid-level athletes who resort to performance-enhancing drugs rarely speak publicly about the choice they’ve made in order to compete, and research that yields accurate numbers is hard to come by, the exact size of the problem is difficult to determine.

The idea that doping is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to when Ben Johnson was caught using stanozolol during the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, is fundamentally incorrect. The use of various drugs and techniques to improve athletic performance has been around much longer. Depending on how one defines what constitutes doping, some stories suggest that the practice of performance enhancement goes back to the original Olympics held in ancient Greece. At that time, athletes were said to consume certain potions or foods thought to confer some benefit on the playing field. In more recent times, doping dates back to at least the midnineteenth century, when racehorses were doped in an effort to ensure the outcome of their races.

In modern times, the term “doping” is often bandied about to describe the use of performance-enhancing drugs, some of which may be entirely legal for one medical purpose or another, but which are outlawed in competition. Yet, some of the drugs and techniques used for performance enhancement are illegal. Among those are designer steroids developed to circumvent current . . .

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