Female Sexual Predators: Understanding Them to Protect Our Children and Youths

Female Sexual Predators: Understanding Them to Protect Our Children and Youths

Female Sexual Predators: Understanding Them to Protect Our Children and Youths

Female Sexual Predators: Understanding Them to Protect Our Children and Youths

Synopsis

This unprecedented look at female sexual predators explains why and how they prey on our children and youths and what adults- and children and youths themselves- should understand to prevent victimization.

• Interviews with victims of female sexual predators and with females convicted of sexual offenses

• The most recent research on female sexual predators and their increasing incidence in the United States and other nations

• Features international studies on the crimes females commit against children and youths, providing the reader with a crosscultural view of female sexual offenders

Excerpt

Sexual crimes are among the most disturbing acts committed by one human being against another. They are disturbing not only because of the sexual nature of the crime but because of the psychological and emotional consequences that follow in their aftermath and because they are most often committed by someone the victim knows. Historically, there has been less acknowledgment and little attention given to females who commit sexual crimes even though females have been documented as committing sexual offenses as early as the 1930s (see Chideckel, 1935). This lack of attention has hindered the information that is needed about female sex offenders in order to prevent their criminal behavior. The same lack of attention has also afforded less recognition, understanding, and support to the people—adults, teens, and children—who are the victims of female sex offenders.

Even though there has been less research of female sexual offenders, what is known from the information that is available is that females commit the same types of sexual crimes as males do. Sexual stalking, sexual harassment, sexual assault, rape, and child sexual abuse are among the types of sexual crimes that both males and females are known to commit. There are, however, also differences. One of the differences between male and female sex offenders is that due to the potential for gender bias, female sexual crimes are more likely to be obscured. Female sexual crimes are obscured due in part to the cultural norms that define female sexual behavior and by the gender stereotypes that define who society identifies as a sex offender. A consequence of this obscurity is that . . .

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