Gender and Violence in the Middle East

Gender and Violence in the Middle East

Gender and Violence in the Middle East

Gender and Violence in the Middle East

Synopsis

The delightful third book in the multimillion-copy internationally bestselling series
Being up against the clock was a real problem for so many people, thought Hector. What could he possibly do to help them?
First he tackled happiness. Then he took on love. And now Hector, our endearing young French psychiatrist, confronts the persistent march of time.
His patients lament that there is not enough time in the day. Or they feel that life is passing them by. And in one case, a young boy turns the problem on its head: He's impatient to grow up! Hector himself is increasingly aware of time: He doesn't feel quite so young anymore, and the clock is ticking on his relationship with his beloved Clara.
So as time flies, so does our wise and winsome hero in his latest adventure, traveling around the world to understand the past, the future, and how best to enjoy the present.

Excerpt

The most important event that has inspired this work was the Iraq War in 2003. No matter what we think about this controversial war, it represents what would have been a historical opportunity to end the country’s long history of violence and dictatorship and to engage in building a more peaceful and tolerant society. Yet the events following the outset of the war took another direction. the capacity of Iraqi society to generate and maintain all of this violence is utterly astonishing. While the Iraqi case is complex, extreme, and continuously changing, violence is a constant feature of life in the Middle East.

A simpler, yet futile and less constructive way of explaining this violence is to externalize it. Rulers in the Middle East are fixated on projecting the ills of society onto imaginary, external enemies. It is no wonder that conspiracy theories have become the most dominant aspect of political and intellectual life in this region.

Internalizing violence is the contrary option that Middle Eastern societies, which are in the midst of a deep multidimensional crisis, seriously need to consider. Violence is a part of the social structure that defines and influences people’s lives. By linking violence to the dominant gender structure, this work is an attempt in this direction. Gender violence, particularly in its broadest and most inclusive sense that includes both male and female violence, is a central aspect of the deeply rooted crisis in Middle Eastern societies. This study shows that everyone plays a part in reproducing and sustaining high levels of violence: men, women, society, the political system, patriarchy, religion, and culture.

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