Healing the Soul after Religious Abuse: The Dark Heaven of Recovery

Healing the Soul after Religious Abuse: The Dark Heaven of Recovery

Healing the Soul after Religious Abuse: The Dark Heaven of Recovery

Healing the Soul after Religious Abuse: The Dark Heaven of Recovery

Synopsis

John Tyndall (1820–93) was an Irish physicist who became fascinated by mountaineering after a scientific expedition to Switzerland in 1856. He traversed the summit of the Matterhorn in 1868 and climbed Mount Blanc three times. Alongside this love of mountains was a scientific interest in glaciers and ice formations. Tyndall was also well-regarded for his ability to communicate with the public about science. Many of his books, such as this one, published in 1872 as part of the International Scientific Series, are aimed at the general reader. Tyndall uses this work to explain many aspects of water, beginning with cloud formation and rain before moving on to ice, snow and glaciers. He also discusses the principles behind phenomena ranging from tropical rains to glacial movement. Illustrated and organised into 493 different points under themed headings, this book gives clear explanations of the complexity of the earth's water system.

Excerpt

The Religion, Health, and Healing series brings together authors from a variety of academic disciplines and cultural settings in order to foster understandings of the ways in which religious traditions, concepts, and practices frame health and healing experiences in diverse historical and social contexts. Exploring the many ramifications of the roles played by religious traditions in the lives of adherents, volumes in the series include cases in which the authority invested in religious leaders and teachers is used to heal, as well as cases in which that authority is distorted and used to wound those who have come for help and healing. the present volume provides insight into what author Mikele Rauch characterizes as the wounding of the soul in religious communities around the United States.

Other books in this series have explored the word “healing” as a multidimensional and multifunctional concept, especially in religious settings. It can mean the direct, unequivocal, and scientifically measurable cure of physical illnesses. It can mean the alleviation of pain or other symptoms. It can also mean coping, coming to terms with, or learning to live with that which one cannot change (including physical illness and emotional trauma). Healing can mean integration and connection among all the elements of one’s being, reestablishment of self-worth, connection with one’s tradition, or personal empowerment. It can also involve the pursuit of justice and equity as a process of resisting the forces that generate social ills. Healing can be about repairing one’s relationships with friends, relations, ancestors, the community, the world, the Earth, and/or God. It can refer to the development of a sense of well-being or wholeness, whether emotional, social, spiritual, physical, or in relation to other aspects of being that are valued by a particular group. Healing can be about purification, repenting from sin, the cleaning up of one’s negative karma, entry into a path of “purer,” abstinent, or more moral daily living, eternal salvation, or submission to God’s will.

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